Blogs Elevator Pitch (Blogs as a Frontporch)

So I blogged a while back that this hot chick had linked to me. There aren’t too many female bloggers and her feed looked interesting so I subscribed. Low and behold the next day she has a Gem of a blog on why companies need to be blogging.

I agree with Dina about some ot the thoughts she thinks should be in more pitches to companies about blogging. But especially “Call to action” This is what companies don’t get. When you start blogging, you start getting more feed back, and less noise. You get rational feed back rather than just “your product sucks.” You create a dialog with your customers and employees.

I’m to late for this Blogging Pitch contest, but if I had to pitch blogging:

Who is the face of your company? There was a time when we could identify the CEO and founder of many of the products we use, or could personally identify with a spokesperson for the company. Be that Steve Jobs, or Morris the Cat, we had a tangible if irrational image of that spokesperson being the embodiement of that company.

Part of why Microsoft is viewed as cold and unfeeling, is because we view Bill Gates that way. Right or wrong we have this vision of entire companies being one person. Blogging lets you have employees be spokes people. They become approachable, visible, and hopefully likable. You can stand back and watch Robert Scoble figuring things out, you see the wheels turning and then the lights go on in his head as he realizes why Xbox Live is more than just a kids toy, you can feel his excitement as he tries to convey to his audience a concept that he gets but doesn’t know how to put in to words. But what you really get is this face for Microsoft that is not Gates or Balmer, but rather someone more like you, that you can approach, that you can relate to.

Blogging to the outside is about building relationships. You don’t have to turn every reader in to a dyed in the wool customer, but you turn them in to some one who is willing to consider your company when they go to spend their hard earned money. You build loyalty, and you show that you do care about the feedback you get. Blogging is like sitting on your front porch and waving to your neighbors as they walk by. You don’t have to have a great dialog with each of them, but they will remember who you are and think of you when they need something, or be there to help out when they can.

Blogging to the inside is about building relationships, but it is also about perpetuating dialog. A blog lets you put your idea out for everyone to see. It is like the ultimate suggestion box. And because blogging happens on neutral ground no one has to take offense to contradictary ideas. You can say this is what I feel we need to be doing, and if some one else says, this is what we should be doing instead, the discussion can be about the ideas not the people. You don’t get that level playing field in a conference room where you worry about rank, or department, or even if you like the other person. Blogs are like coming home after work, sitting down on the front porch and having a beer with your co-workers.

Blogs are just a front porch.