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Blind Trust Walk:

Blind Trust Walk:

Props: Just your group (or optional rope and/or blindfolds)

A.L.: 2

D.L.: 2

Focus: Trust Communication

Credit: Kimball Camp YMCA

Have each person find a partner. Assemble the group into a straight, double file (?) line, where the partners are standing next to each other in the line. Hand out blindfolds (optional) to everyone on the left side of the line. (Boy this is hard to explain! If you don’t understand, ask me. I’ll show it to you!) With the blindfolds securely in place, take the group for a walk. You lead, and let the sighted partner decide how he she will guide their partner. They can do it in one of two ways:

1. By touch ONLY.

2. By voice ONLY.

They must guide their blindfolded partner on the paths you lead by one of these two methods. You, as leader, must constantly be looking back to make sure they are doing this properly! (Occasionally you get the people who think running their partner into things is a fun time, so keep an eye out. My bet is you’ll be able to tell who would do that the second you pass out blindfolds!) After a few minutes, have the partners switch roles.

Variations: You can vary this activity in many ways. For less trusting people, you can allow them to keep their eyes closed. (Some people are very apprehensive about being blindfolded. For me, personally, I just don’t like wearing nasty, smelly blindfolds.) You can also choose to blindfold the entire group and lead them around simply by having them hold onto a rope. (Note: the people closest to you will have an easy time of it, and those farther away are more likely to run into objects. Be careful!) You can make the group guide one another by sounds, not words. This will require the partners to set up some sort of code between them.

Focus:

Trust. Plain and simple. There is little risk in this activity, but it will help to set the tone for later Trust exercises. This could be a great test to see whether or not your group will make it to Trust Fall.

Processing:

Based on how your partner led you, do you feel you trust them more or less now? What could they have done differently? Did you fully trust your partner before the activity began? How hard did your partner work to earn your trust? (Would you like, just to be vengeful, to lead your partner through the forest again?) (If you used the rope, ask who had the easiest time following you? Why? So those who stay closest to the leader have an easier time? How does this relate to faith in Christ?)

Spotting Concerns:

Watch people deliberately walking their partners into obstacles! (It does happen.) Keep the pace slow, smooth and gentle. This is an orientation to Trust, so you don’t want to traumatize people right away…