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Michelin Gorge:

Michelin Gorge:

Props: Tires over Stream, Waterproof Boots

A.L.: 5

D.L.: 4

Focus: Cooperation / Caring

Credit: Cowstails and Cobras II (page 115-117)

Okay! I can’t think of a story! I have sat and sat and sat some more, but I still can’t find a really cool and different story to put with this activity. Your job, should you choose to do this activity, is to find an adequate story. Or not. It’s up to you.

What your group must do, however, is to cross the stream without getting wet. This is not as easy as it seems… Using only the tires, the single rope, and their wits, your group must manage to get everyone across the stream and safely upon the hill on the other side. There are trees on both sides which may be used, if reachable, but make .sure that the way the group uses them is safe. (Note: tires MUST be-used! No simply vaulting

over the stream!)

The activity begins with the entire group standing on the “opposite” side of the stream, near the rope. They are allowed to go as far forward as the landscape timber on the side of the hill, but may not go any farther. They must figure out how to reach the rope without climbing down the hill and/or using any additional means of reach (ie. sticks, etc..).

Once the rope is in hand, they must figure out how to use it to reach the nearest tire and so forth. They will have to work together, however! People with high degrees of athletic ability can cross the stream easily. For the entire team to make it requires a tremendous amount of teamwork. The group must make sure that those with lesser skill can accomplish the task, though how they do this varies.

Your job, as facilitator, is to stand in the water and spot those coming across. To do this, stand underneath the tires, moving with the participants to prevent them from falling. If multiple people begin crossing, have everyone get into a “secure” position while one person moves. As soon as that person is safe in their new position, start the next one moving. Remain in your position until everyone is safely across.

Focus:

Cooperation. This takes a great deal of working together to get the job done. Caring. Caring is far more important, here. Everyone must make it across and to do that, everyone must look out for each other. I need to be aware of, and understanding about the differences of those on my team. If I go on my own, can the task be accomplished? No. I need to help others through, swing tires back, reach out and catch, etc.. The goal is teamwork, and that is the only way it’s going to happen!

Processing:

Who could have accomplished this on their own? Who really needed help? Was the order decided before the group attempted to cross? Would it have helped if it was? Who had the most creative moment during this activity? Who does the group feel was the most helpful? Why?

Spotting Concerns:

Let’s see… People swinging on tires, five feet off the slippery, rocky streambed, changing from one tire to another in death-defying exchanges! No. I really don’t see any possible problems with this activity! (Other than the fact that someone could slip and fall to their deaths, but that can’t really be considered a problem, can it?)