Recipes for Biscuits, Rolls, and Small Cakes

RAISED BISCUIT.  MRS. M. A. MOORHEAD.

One pint sweet milk, one half cup butter, one tablespoonful sugar, one
tablespoonful yeast, a little salt, whites of two eggs beaten stiff.
Make the sponge at supper time.  At bed time, work in flour to make a
stiff dough.  Put in warm place to rise over night.  In the morning
turn it out on the kneading board.  Smooth out with the hand about one
inch thick; cut in small cakes; let stand five minutes; put in oven;
bake fifteen minutes.  Delicious for breakfast.

BEATEN BISCUIT.  GAIL HAMILTON.

One quart flour, one heaping tablespoonful lard, water to make stiff
dough, a little salt.  Beat well with rolling pin; work into flat
biscuit; make a few holes in each with a fork.  Bake in quick oven.

TO MAKE RUSKS.  MRS. G. A. WRIGHT.

One quart of bread sponge, one coffee-cup white sugar, one teacup
butter, two eggs, one pint sweet milk, a little salt.  Beat the sugar
and eggs well before adding the milk.  Flour to knead well.

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS.  MRS. CHARLES MOORE.

Rub one-half teaspoon of lard and one-half of butter into two quarts
of sifted flour.  Into a well in the center of flour, one pint cold
boiled milk, and add one-half cup yeast or one cake dry yeast,
dissolved in one-half cup warm water, one-half cup sugar, and a little
salt.  Set at one o’clock [ten p.m. for dinner next day?]; make up at
two o’clock, and put in pans at half past four for six o’clock tea.
Keep in warm place.

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT.  MRS. H. T. VAN FLEET.

To one pint of flour, add two teaspoonfuls of baking powder; sift
together; add one heaping tablespoon of butter, and a pinch of salt.
Use enough sweet milk to make a very soft mixture.  Work the butter
through the milk in the center of flour.  Do not roll out on board, as
the mixture is too soft, but make out by hand as you would light
rolls.  Avoid kneading.  Bake in quick oven.

DELICIOUS TEA ROLLS.  MRS. U. F. SEFFNER.

Two tablespoonfuls butter, two tablespoonfuls sugar, two eggs.  Beat
the three articles all together; add a little salt, one cup sweet
milk, two cups flour, three teaspoonfuls baking powder.  Grease a
large dripping pan with butter.  Drop a tablespoonful in each place.
Bake twenty minutes.

GOOD MUFFINS (CHEAP AND EASY).  MRS. E. FAIRFIELD.

One egg, one cup milk, one tablespoon sugar, one tablespoon butter,
two teacups flour, three teaspoons baking powder, one teaspoon salt.
Mix yolk of egg, butter, and sugar; add then the flour, baking powder,
and salt, sifted together; then white of egg, beaten well.  Bake ten
minutes in quick oven.  Much of the success in baking depends upon
having the iron muffin ring well heated on the top of stove before
putting the batter in them.

MUFFINS.  MRS. W. C. BUTCHER.

Three eggs beaten separately, one-half cup of sugar, two-thirds cup of
butter, one pint of sweet milk, two heaping teaspoons of baking
powder; add flour to make it as thick as cake batter.

MUFFIN OR SHORTCAKE DOUGH.  MRS. DR. McMURRAY.

Two pints of flour, three tablespoons of sugar, one tablespoon of
melted butter, one egg, one pint of sweet milk, three teaspoons of
baking powder.  Bake in a quick oven in muffin rings, or drop the
dough from the end of your spoon as you do for drop cake.  To be eaten
hot.  Try with a broom splint, as cake.  Enough for four or five large
persons.

QUICK MUFFINS.  MRS. S. E. BARLOW.

One cup flour, one heaping teaspoon baking powder, one egg, two
tablespoons melted butter, a little salt; mix all together; before
stirring them, add sufficient water to make a stiff batter.  Bake in
hot oven about fifteen minutes.

MUFFINS.  MRS. A. C. AULT.

One cup sweet milk, one-half cup butter, one egg, one tablespoonful
sugar, two teaspoonfuls baking powder, two and one-half cups flour, a
pinch salt.

“ELECTRIC LIGHT FLOUR” is guaranteed pure winter wheat flour.

MUFFINS.  MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

To each cup of flour, add two teaspoons of baking powder, large pinch
of salt; moisten with sweet milk to the consistency of drop dough.
Have muffin pans hot, with a teaspoonful of butter in each.  Bake ten
minutes in hot oven.

CORN MUFFINS.  E. S.

Make just as you do wheat muffins, using one-half wheat flour, and
one-half corn meal.

Graham muffins are made in the same manner, using equal parts wheat
and graham flour.

FRENCH BREAD GRIDDLE CAKES.  MRS. R. H. JOHNSON.

One pint bread-crumbs.  One pint milk; scald, and pour over bread
crumbs at night to make a batter.  Four eggs, two cups or less flour,
one-half cup or less butter.  Bake like buckwheats.

VERY NICE CORN MEAL GRIDDLE CAKES.  MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

One pint rich sour milk, one well beaten egg, one large tablespoon
flour, teaspoon soda, meal enough to make the mixture not quite as
thick as for flour cakes.

CORN MEAL GRIDDLE CAKES.  MRS. F. E. H. SELLERS.

One and one-half pints sour milk, one good teaspoonful soda, one
teaspoonful salt, one pint corn meal, one-half pint flour, one egg.

ANNIE’S CORN CAKES.

One egg, one pint of sour milk, one-half teaspoonful soda, pinch salt,
one-half cup flour, corn meal to make not too stiff a batter.

MUSH.  W. R. C.

To three quarts of boiling water, add salt to taste.  Stir in
gradually sufficient corn meal to make it quite thick.  Boil slowly
one hour.  Stir often, and beat well; that will make it light and
smooth.  Eat with cream, milk, and butter, or syrup.  To fry when
cold, cut in thin slices, and fry in lard and butter, mixed.

TO FRY HOT MUSH.  MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

Fry slices of bacon; remove the meat; drop in the mush by spoonfuls,
and fry delicate brown.

GERMICELLI.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Stir germicelli into two quarts of boiling water until as thick as
mush; add salt.  Boil five or ten minutes, stirring constantly.  Just
before serving, you can stir in a cup of sweet milk, if you wish.
When cold, slice, and fry same as corn mush.

OAT MEAL CRACKERS.  JENNIE L. HARRINGTON.

Two cups oat meal (rolled oats is best), three cups flour, one cup
shortening, one cup sugar, one cup water, one teaspoonful salt, three
teaspoonfuls baking powder; roll very thin.

LEMON CRACKERS.  MRS. E. S. JORDAN.

Two and three-fourths cups of granulated sugar, one cup of butter, one
pint of sweet milk, one cup of lard, three eggs, five cents worth of
lemon oil, five cents worth carbonate of ammonia, a pinch of salt.
Mix stiff, and roll thin; stick with a fork, and bake in a quick oven.

MILK TOAST.  MISS H. W.

Boil one quart of milk; stir into it two tablespoonfuls butter, mixed
with one tablespoonful flour, and a saltspoonful salt.  Let the whole
boil five minutes.  Have ready a dish of toasted bread; pour the milk
over it, and serve hot.  Nice for breakfast.

FRITTERS.

Separate four eggs; beat the yolks until light; add to them one quart
of sweet milk, a little salt.  Beat the whites very stiff; stir in one
quart of flour, and the whites, half and half, with one teaspoonful of
baking powder.  In a tablespoonful of batter, place a slice of nice
sour apple; drop into hot lard, and fry nice brown on both sides.
Serve hot, with butter and syrup.

Make oyster fritters the same way, using fine large oysters in place
of apples.

ORANGE FRITTERS.–Made in same way, using slices of orange instead of
apple.

PINEAPPLE FRITTERS.–Made in same manner, only stir into the batter a
pineapple, grated or chopped fine.

SPANISH FRITTERS.  MRS. E. S.

Cut the soft of bread into pieces two or three inches long and one
inch thick.  Take one pint and a half of sweet milk; sweeten to taste;
add six well beaten eggs, a little salt; dip the pieces of bread in
the mixture; let them become well saturated.  Fry in hot lard until a
delicate brown.

FOR CANNING CORN.  MRS. MARTHA WRIGHT.

To five pints green corn, add three pints water; cook five minutes;
then dissolve three level teaspoons tartaric acid, and add to corn;
cook a few minutes longer; then it is ready to can in new or nearly
new tin cans.

When preparing for table, drain off liquid; add a very little water;
season and sweeten to taste.  When boiling, add one level teaspoon
soda dissolved in hot water.

SCHMIER KASE.  OLIVE BARKS.

One gallon of sour milk; scald until crumbly; let drip until whey is
separated from curd; mash fine; salt to suit the taste; add one pint
of rich sour cream; stir till all is thoroughly mixed together.

The old reliable milliner–Jennie Thomas, 121 S. Main.