Recipes for Canned Fruits and Jellies

CANNED FRUIT AND JELLIES.

“Will’t please your honor, taste of these conserves?”
                                                         –Shakespeare

CANNED FRUIT IN GENERAL.  MRS. F. E. BLAKE.

For peaches, for instance, set on the stove a kettle of cold
water–just enough so the can will not tip over; into this kettle, put
one-half dozen nails to keep the can from touching the bottom; then
fill the can full of peaches, cut in halves; then fill the can with
cold water; add two tablespoonfuls of sugar, and set in kettle to
boil; let boil until the fruit is tender, but not enough to break
while cooking.  When done nicely, put the top on the can, and set
away.

RASPBERRY JAM.  MRS. E. S.

Weigh equal parts of fruit and sugar.  Put the fruit into a preserving
pan, and mash with a silver or wooden spoon; let boil up; then add the
sugar; stir all the time while cooking.  Strawberry or blackberry jam
is made the same way.  Thirty or forty minutes is sufficient time for
cooking.

TO PRESERVE PEACHES.  L. D.

Take equal portions of peaches and sugar; pare, stone, and quarter the
fruit.  Put the sugar with the peaches; let stand over night.  In the
morning, boil slowly in preserving kettle one hour and three-fourths;
skim well.

TO PRESERVE QUINCES.  L. D.

Pare and core. Be sure you get out all the seeds.  Boil the skins and
cores one hour; then strain through a coarse cloth; boil your quinces
in this juice until tender; drain them out; add the weight of the
quinces in sugar to this syrup; boil, and skim until clear; then put
in the quinces.  Boil three hours slowly.

TOMATO BUTTER.  MRS. J. KISHLER.

To one quart of tomato, add one pint of apple; put both through sieve;
one quart of sugar, some ground cinnamon; cook until it begins to look
like a preserve.

ORANGE MARMALADE.  MRS. DR. TRUE.

To eighteen ripe oranges, use six pounds best white sugar.  Grate the
peel from four oranges; reserve for marmalade. (The rinds of the
remainder will not be used).  Pare the fruit, removing the white skin
as well as the yellow; slice the oranges; remove all seeds.  Put the
fruit and grated peel into a preserving kettle; boil until reduced to
a smooth mass; rub quickly through a colander; stir in the sugar;
return to the stove; boil fast, stirring constantly, one-half hour, or
until thick.  Put in glasses, or jars; cover closely when cold.

CURRANT JELLY.  MISS KITTIE SMITH.

A FRENCH CONFECTIONERS RECIPE.–Allow one pound of sugar to one pint
of juice.  Boil the juice five minutes, and add the sugar, which has
been previously well heated; boil one minute, stirring carefully.
Always a success.

CURRANT JELLY.  MRS. DR. TRUE.

Weigh the currants on the stems.  Do not wash them, but carefully
remove all leaves; or whatever may adhere to them.  Put a few of the
currants into kettle (porcelain lined or granite iron); mash them to
secure juice to keep from burning; add the remainder of the fruit, and
boil freely for twenty-five minutes, stirring occasionally; strain
through a three-cornered bag of strong texture, putting the liquid in
earthen or wooden vessels (never in tin).  Return the strained liquid
to the kettle without the trouble of measuring; let it boil well for a
moment or two; add half the amount of granulated or loaf sugar. As
soon as the sugar is dissolved, the jelly is done.  Put in glasses.

PINEAPPLE JAM.

Peel, grate, and weigh the apple.  Put pound to pound of pineapple and
sugar.  Boil it in a preserving kettle thirty or forty minutes.

CRABAPPLE JELLY.

Boil the apples, with just enough water to cover them, until tender;
mash with a spoon, and strain out the juice.  Take a pint of juice to
a pound of sugar; boil thirty minutes, and strain through a hair
sieve.

ROSE GERANIUM JELLY.  MRS. SAMUEL BARTRAM.

Drop one large or two small leaves of rose geranium plant into a quart
of apple jelly a few moments before it is done, and you will add a
novel and peculiarly delightful flavor to the jelly.

CRABAPPLE MARMALADE.

Boil the apples in a kettle until soft, with just enough water to
cover them; mash, and strain through a coarse sieve.  Take a pound of
apple to a pound of sugar; boil half an hour, and put into jars.

CRANBERRY JELLY.  MRS. G. A. LIVINGSTON.

One pound of sugar to each pint of juice; boil, and skim.  Test by
dropping a little into cold water; when it does not mingle with the
water, it is done.

APPLE JELLY.  MRS. E. SEFFNER.

Ten quarts of sour apples, stewed very soft in sufficient water to
cover the fruit; drain over night through a flannel bag, without
pressing; add one pint of sugar to each pint of juice, and three
sliced lemons; boil twenty minutes; strain into glasses or bowls.

PEAR MARMALADE.  MRS. E. SEFFNER.

EXCELLENT FOR TARTS.–Pare and core, then boil the pears to a pulp.
Take half their weight of sugar; put it into the kettle with a little
water; boil until like taffy; skim while boiling; add the pulp of the
pears, about four drops of essence of cloves; boil up once or twice.

PRESERVED STRAWBERRIES.  MRS. KATE MARTIN, TIFFIN, OHIO.

Use one pound of granulated sugar to each quart of berries.  Make a
syrup of the sugar, and sufficient water to moisten it.  While
boiling, drop in the berries, and let them boil ten minutes.  Skim out
the fruit, and put it on a platter.  Boil the syrup ten minutes
longer; then pour it over the berries, and set where it will get the
sun for two days.  Put in jelly glasses, and seal.  Made in this way,
the fruit retains both color and flavor.

TO PRESERVE RASPBERRIES AND STRAWBERRIES.  L. D.

Put pound to pound of sugar and fruit; let stand over night.  In the
morning, boil all together fifteen minutes.  Skim out the berries;
boil the syrup till thick and clear; pour over the fruit.

For millinery go to Jennie Thomas, the oldest and best.

CANNED STRAWBERRIES.  MRS. G. A. LIVINGSTON.

For every quart of strawberries, take one pint of sugar; add a
tablespoonful or two of water.  Let sugar dissolve; then add fruit,
and let boil.  Can immediately in air-tight glass cans.

CHOPPED QUINCES.  MRS. ELIZA DICKERSON.

Pare the quinces; cut in small squares; cover with water, and stew
until tender; pour into a colander, and drain.  To each pint of the
juice, add three-fourths pint of sugar. Let boil, and skim well for
ten or fifteen minutes; then put in the quinces; cook until the syrup
begins to jell.  Put in glasses, and seal same as jelly.

CANNED PINEAPPLE.  MRS. LULU DANN.

Take equal measurements of shredded pineapple and sugar.  Place in a
crock alternately, a layer of shredded pineapple and one of sugar; let
this stand over night.  In the morning, drain off the juice, and to
three cups of juice, add one cup of water.   After this mixture comes
to a boil, put in the pulp of your pineapple, and let boil up (not
cook).  Seal in self sealing jars.