Recipes for Delicacies

DELICACIES.

“Custards for supper, and an endless host of other such lady-like
luxuries.”
                                                            –SHELLEY.

APPLE FLOAT.  MRS. M. E. WRIGHT.

To one quart apples, stewed and well mashed, put whites of three eggs
(well beaten), and four heaping tablespoons of sugar; beat together
for fifteen minutes.  Serve with cream.

FLOAT.  FLORENCE TURNEY.

One pint milk, one tablespoon corn starch, yolks of two eggs.  Beat
yolks, and add one tablespoon cream, one cup coffee A sugar.  Flavor
when cool.

FLOAT.  FLORENCE TURNEY.

Put two quarts of milk into a tin bucket, and place in a kettle of
boiling water.  While waiting for milk to boil, take the yolks of four
eggs, beat, and add one tablespoonful of cream or milk, one cup of
coffee A sugar, two teaspoonfuls of sifted flour; beat this to a
creamy mixture.  When the milk boils, take some of it, stir into the
mixture, and then slowly pour this mixture into the rest of the
boiling milk, stirring all the time.  Put on the lid of the bucket;
let boil for a few minutes.  Flavor with vanilla.  When cool, put in
dish.  Take the whites of four eggs; beat stiff; add granulated sugar;
beat quite a while.  Flavor with vanilla.  Spread this over the top of
the float, and on top of this put bits of jelly.

CHARLOTTE RUSSE.

A very nice recipe for charlotte russe made with gelatine is as
follows:  Use one pint of cream whipped till light, one ounce of
gelatine dissolved in one gill of hot milk, the well beaten whites of
two eggs, one small teacupful of powdered sugar, and any flavoring
preferred.  Mix the eggs, sugar and cream together, and then beat in
the dissolved gelatine.  The milk should be quite cold before it is
added to the other ingredients.  Line a dish with slices of sponge
cake, or with lady fingers, and fill with cream.  Set it on ice to
cool.

LEMON SPONGE OR SNOW PUDDING.  OZELLA SEFFNER.

One-half box gelatine, juice of three lemons, one pint of cold water,
one-half pint of hot water, two teacups of sugar, whites of three
eggs.  Soak one-half box of gelatine in one pint of cold water ten
minutes; then dissolve over the fire, adding the juice of the lemons
with the hot water and sugar.  Boil all together two or three minutes;
pour into a dish, and let it remain until nearly cold and beginning to
set; then add the whites of eggs, well beaten, and whisk ten minutes.
When it becomes the consistency of sponge, wet the inside of cups with
the white of egg, pour in the sponge, and set in a cold place.  Serve
with thin custard, made with the yolks of four eggs, one tablespoonful
of corn starch, one-half teacup of sugar, one pint of milk,
teaspoonful of vanilla.  Boil until sufficiently thick, and serve cold
over the sponge.

LEMON JELLY.  GAIL HAMILTON.

One-half box gelatine, one-half pint cold water, one-half pint boiling
water, one-half cup sugar, juice of two lemons.

ORANGE JELLY.  MRS. O. W. WEEKS.

Take six large, juicy oranges, one lemon, one pound loaf sugar,
one-half ounce gelatine.  Dissolve the sugar in one-half pint of
water.  Pour one-half pint boiling water over the gelatine, and when
dissolved, strain it.  Put the sugar and water on the fire.  When it
boils, add the gelatine, the juice of the oranges, and the lemon, with
a little of the peel.  Let come to a boil; then strain in molds to
cool.

ORANGE JELLY.  MRS. L. D. HAMILTON.

Soak one box gelatine in half pint cold water until soft, add one cup
boiling water, juice of one lemon, one cup sugar, one pint orange
juice; stir until sugar is dissolved; then strain.

ORANGE SOUFFLE.  MRS. GEORGE TURNER.

Pare and slice eight oranges, boil one cup sugar, one pint milk, three
eggs, one tablespoon corn starch.  As soon as thick, pour over the
oranges; beat the whites of eggs to a stiff froth; sweeten; put on
top, and brown in oven.  Serve cold.

ORANGE CREAM.  MRS. S. E. BARLOW.

Take half a box of gelatine, and cover with eight tablespoonfuls of
cold water, and soak a half hour.  Stand the gelatine over the
teakettle for a few minutes to melt; then add it to a pint of orange
juice, and a cup of sugar, and strain.  Turn this mixture into a dish,
and stand in a cool place, watching carefully, and stirring
occasionally.  Whip a pint of cream to a stiff froth.  As soon as the
orange gelatine begins to congeal, stir in the whipped cream; turn
into a mold, and stand it over in a cold place.  Served with angels
food, it makes a most delicate dessert.

BAVARIAN CREAM.  MRS. CHAS. MOORE.

One can shredded pineapple, and one cup sugar; let come to a boil;
one-half box gelatine dissolved in a cup of warm water.  When milk
becomes warm, stir gelatine into pineapple, and add one pint of
whipped cream.  Whip all together thoroughly, and set away in a cold
place.

AMBROSIA FOR ONE.  A. L. OOLAH, OR GEORGE VAN FLEET.

Fill a saucer with fresh peaches, finely sliced, or strawberries,
carefully picked and selected; over this, place a measure of
ice-cream, vanilla flavor.  Cover all with powdered sugar to the depth
of one-fourth inch.  Eat with spoon (if your income is over twenty
thousand dollars, you can use a strawberry fork).  Serve with angels
food, or almond macaroons.

JELLIED FRUIT.  MRS. RETTA LUCAS.

Soak two-thirds box gelatine in one-half cup cold water; stand until
dissolved; pour one-half teacup hot water over the dissolved gelatine.
Take the juice of two lemons, two oranges, one and one-half cups
sugar.  Separate one orange into smallest dimensions, removing the
seeds.  Lay bananas, cut in small pieces, and malaga grapes with the
oranges in the bottom of mold; strain the liquid over these, and set
to cool.

GELATINE, WITH FRUIT.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Take one ounce box of gelatine; put to soak in a pint of cold water
for an hour.  Take the juice of three lemons, and one orange, with
three cups of sugar; add this to the gelatine, and pour over all three
pints of boiling water; let this boil up once, stirring all the time.
Take two molds of the same size, and pour half your jelly into each.
Stir into one mold half a cup of candied cherries, and into the other
one pound of blanched almonds.  The almonds will rise to the top.  Let
these molds stand on ice, or in a cool place until thoroughly
set–twenty-four hours is best.  When ready to serve, loosen the
sides, and place the almond jelly on top the other, on a fruit
platter.  Slice down, and serve with whipped cream.

FRUIT RECIPE FOR HOT WEATHER.

Remove the rind of two lemons, and cut the lemons in small pieces; add
two cups of sugar, one pint of boiling water, three tablespoons of
corn starch; mix with a little milk; put them all together, and boil
slowly for five minutes.  Cut into small bits four oranges; put in a
deep dish, ready for the table, and sprinkle over them a little fine
sugar; pour the lemon compound over them.  When cold, whip whites of
two eggs; add a very little sugar.  Flavor with lemon extract.  Put in
ice box to cool.

FRUIT SALAD.  CARRIE LINSLEY.

Place a layer of sliced oranges in the bottom of a glass dish; then a
layer of bananas; one of pineapple; sprinkle confectioners sugar
between layers; continue this until the dish is nearly full; then pile
high with fresh grated cocoanut.

FRUIT SALAD.  CARRIE LINSLEY.

Two oranges, two peaches, two bananas, a few slices of pineapple,
one-half pound of mixed nuts, one-fourth pound of figs, candied
cherries, juice of three lemons, one-half box of gelatine, one pint of
boiling water, two cups of sugar, whipped cream to make clear; avoid
stirring.

KENTUCKY PUDDING.  MAMIE FAIRFIELD.

CUSTARD.–Two quarts milk, six eggs, two tablespoons corn starch, one
cup sugar, a pinch salt, one tablespoon vanilla; add to this one quart
whipped cream, one pint each candied or preserved cherries, pineapple,
and strawberries.  Let custard cool before adding cream and fruit.
Freeze as ice-cream.

PEACH ICE-CREAM.  NELL LINSLEY.

One pint new milk, one pint sweet cream, one cup sugar, one quart
peach pulp (peeled ripe or canned peaches, and put through the
colander).  Let cream and milk come to a boil; add sugar, and cool;
add peach pulp, and freeze.

FROZEN ORANGES.  Rub the rinds of four oranges in a pound of loaf
sugar; peel one dozen oranges; take out the pulp; add it to sugar with
the juice of three lemons; set it on ice two hours; then a quart of
ice water, and freeze hard, and serve in glasses.

A DAINTY DESSERT.

Frozen fruit makes a dainty and acceptable dessert for dinner or lunch
during the summer, and is prepared by mixing and freezing, the same as
water ices, then working and cutting the fruits, and using without
straining.

FROZEN CHERRIES.

Stone one quart of acid cherries; mix them with two pounds of sugar,
and stand aside one hour; stir thoroughly; add a quart of ice water;
put in the freezer, and stir rapidly until frozen; heat smooth; set
aside half an hour, and serve.  That is the way to make frozen
cherries.

FROZEN AMBROSIA.

To make frozen ambrosia, pare and slice a dozen sour oranges; lay in a
bowl; sprinkle with sugar; cover with grated cocoanut; let stand two
hours; mix all together; freeze. Take up in a large glass bowl; lay
over the top thin slices of orange; sprinkle with cocoanut and sugar.

FROZEN PEACHES AND PLUMS.

Pare a dozen and a half ripe, soft peaches.  Remove the skin and seeds
from a quart of sour plums; mash, and add to the peaches.  Work the
kernels of both to a paste; add them to the sugar and fruit; let stand
two hours; then add a quart of ice water; stir, and freeze.  This is a
delicious dish.

PINEAPPLE SOUFFLE.

Pare, and remove the eyes from two good-sized pineapples; then chop
into bits, and sprinkle with one-half pound of sugar; let the whole
stand until quite soft; then mash, and strain through a fine sieve.
To one quart of juice so obtained, add one quart of water and twelve
eggs, which have been rubbed to a cream with one and one-half pounds
of sugar.  Put the mixture in a farina kettle, and cook till it
assumes the thickness of soft custard; then strain, and beat briskly
till cold.  Freeze, and serve with sweet cream, flavored with fruit
juice.

BISQUE ICE-CREAM.

Put in a farina kettle one quart of good sweet cream, three-quarters
of a pound of sugar, and one tablespoonful of vanilla extract, and
allow the mixture to cook till the water in the outer kettle boils;
then remove from the fire.  Brown two ounces of macaroons in a
moderate oven; cool, and roll to a fine powder; stir into the cream,
and when cold, freeze.

LEMON SHERBERT.  MRS. G. H. WRIGHT.

To one quart of sweet milk, add one pint of sugar, the well beaten
whites of two eggs, and the juice of three lemons.  Add the lemon
juice after it commences to freeze.

LEMON ICE.  MRS. H. T. VAN FLEET.

To one quart of water, add four cups of sugar; let this come to
boiling point; let cool; strain through a cloth; add the juice of six
lemons, and juice of two oranges; beat the whites of six eggs to a
stiff froth.  Put the syrup in the freezer; then add the beaten
whites.  Freeze same as ice-cream.  Stir constantly until sufficiently
frozen.

APRICOT ICE.  ALICE FAIRFIELD.

Make syrup same as lemon ice; add one can of apricots (mashed fine),
three lemons, and juice of one orange, if wanted.  Freeze same as
lemon ice.

ORANGE SHERBERT.  M. E. BEALE.

One tablespoon of gelatine, one pint of cold water, one cup of sugar,
six oranges or one pint of juice, one-half cup of boiling water.  Soak
the gelatine in one-half cup of cold water ten minutes.  Put the sugar
and remainder of cold water in a large pitcher; squeeze the juice into
the pitcher; add it to the gelatine after it is dissolved; strain into
the can, and freeze.