Recipes for Fancy Puddings

PUDDINGS

“The proof of the pudding lies in the eating.”

APPLE PUDDING.  MRS. G. H. WRIGHT.

Six good-sized apples, stewed and well beaten; six eggs, beaten
separately; one pint of sweet cream; sweeten and flavor to taste.
Bake with an under crust.  It can be eaten with whipped cream and is
excellent.

APPLE BATTER PUDDING.  MISS KITTIE M. SMITH.

Mix together one cup flour, one teaspoonful of baking powder, a pinch
of salt; into this rub one tablespoonful of butter.  Beat one egg, and
stir into it half a cup of milk; add this to the flour, etc.  Pare and
slice two sour apples, and press into the dough. Bake about one-half
hour. The beauty of this pudding is that you are always sure of
success.  This recipe makes enough for a family of four.

SAUCE.–One cup of sugar, two-thirds of a cup of butter, two
tablespoonfuls of flour, three gills of boiling water; boil three
minutes; flavor to taste.

APPLE ROLL.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Roll plain pie crust as you would for pie, but a little larger; chop
up some apples, and cover this crust; add a layer of sugar, and
sprinkle with cinnamon; then add a layer of raisins, and sprinkle with
bits of citron, chopped fine.  Roll all up; pinch the crust closely
together at sides and ends; place in dripping pan with one-half a cup
of butter, and one cup of sugar; pour enough boiling water over it to
half cover the roll; put in oven and bake three hours; baste every
half hour as you would turkey.  When done, the roll will have a crust
like taffy.  Take out, and serve sliced thin.  It is delicious.

BIRDS NEST PUDDING.  MRS. JOHN KISHLER.

Pare six or eight large good cooking apples; remove the core by
cutting from the end into the middle, so as to leave the apple whole;
place them in a deep pie dish, as near together as they can stand,
with the opening upward.  Make a thin batter, using one quart of milk,
three eggs, and sufficient flour; pour this into the dish around the
apples and into the cavities.  Bake in a quick oven.  Serve with
butter and sugar.

CHOCOLATE PUDDING.  MRS. ALICE KRANER.

Mix one pint of rolled crackers, four tablespoonfuls of chocolate, and
one quart sweet milk; bake two hours, and serve with this–

SAUCE.–Beat one cup of sugar with butter the size of an egg; flavor
with vanilla.

COTTAGE PUDDING.  MRS. JENNIE KRAUSE.

One cup of sugar, one-half cup of milk, one and one-half cups of
flour; and one tablespoonful of butter; bake as a cake, and serve with
this–

SAUCE.–Two tablespoonfuls butter, one cup white sugar, and one
tablespoon flour, wet in cold water; one pint of boiling water.  Let
boil two or three minutes, stirring all the time.  Flavor with lemon.

CUP PUDDING.  MRS. G. A. LIVINGSTON.

One egg, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, three tablespoons butter,
one-half to three-fourths pint of water, one and one-half teacups of
flour, or enough to make a thin batter, one and one-half teaspoons
baking powder; mix with fresh fruit or raisins, and steam twenty
minutes.

CORN STARCH PUDDING.  NELLIE LINSLEY.

One pint sweet milk, whites of three eggs, two tablespoons corn
starch, three tablespoons sugar, and a little salt.  Put milk in
kettle, and when it reaches the boiling point, add sugar, and the corn
starch, dissolved in a little milk.  Lastly, add the whites of eggs,
whipped to a stiff froth.  Beat it, and let cook a few minutes.  Set
two-thirds in a cool place, flavoring it with vanilla.  To the
remaining one-third, add half a cake of chocolate, softened and
mashed.  Put a layer of half the white pudding into the mold; over
this the layer of chocolate, and then the remainder of the white.
One-half a cocoanut or one-half a pineapple may be substituted for the
chocolate.

GOLDEN PUDDING.  MRS. FRED. SCHAEFFER.

One-half a cup of molasses, one-half a cup of butter, one-half a cup
of sour milk, one and one-half cups of flour, one egg, a pinch of
salt, and one-half teaspoonful of soda; mix, and steam two hours.
Serve with this–

SAUCE.–One egg, one-half cup butter, one cup sugar, two tablespoons
flour, and one pint boiling water.  Flavor with vanilla.

STEAMED INDIAN PUDDING.  R. H. JOHNSON.

One-half cup sour milk, two eggs (beaten stiff), one teaspoonful soda,
one cup seeded raisins, two tablespoonfuls molasses, corn meal for a
stiff batter; mix, and steam two hours.  Serve with this–

SAUCE.–One cup sugar, one-half cup butter (beaten to a cream) one
teaspoonful water, yolk of one egg; heat to a scald; add the white of
egg, well beaten, with a pinch of salt; flavor with lemon.

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING.  MRS. M. B. VOSE.

Scald one pint of milk; stir into it one-half cup of Indian meal,
one-half cup molasses, and a pinch of salt.  When this is cold, pour
over it, without stirring, one pint of cold milk.  Bake in a slow oven
about four hours to obtain the color and flavor of the old-fashioned
pudding.

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING.  MRS. M. B. VOSE.

Scald one quart of milk; stir in three-fourths cup of Indian meal,
one-third cup molasses, and a pinch of salt.  Beat two eggs with a
half cup of cold milk, and fill the dish.  Bake one hour.

FRUIT PUDDING.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

One quart of flour, one egg, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one
teaspoonful sugar, butter size of an egg, a little salt; mix with
milk, and roll as for pie crust; cut into pieces four inches square;
in each piece put half of an apple or peach (pared); pinch the corners
together; place in a buttered pan.  On top of each dumpling put a lump
of butter, a little cinnamon, and sugar.  Pour into the pan one-half
pint of water.  Bake, and serve with sweetened milk or cream.

FIG PUDDING.  MRS. B. B. CLARK.

One-half pound figs, one-fourth pound grated bread, two and one-half
ounces powdered sugar, three ounces butter, two eggs, one cup milk.
Chop the figs fine; and mix first with the butter; add the other
ingredients by degrees.  Put in a buttered mold, sprinkle with bread
crumbs, cover tightly, and boil for three hours.

FRUIT PUDDING.  MISS ANN THOMPSON.

One egg, six even tablespoonfuls sugar, six heaping tablespoonfuls
flour, one heaping tablespoonful baking powder, milk to make batter a
little thinner than cake dough.  Put fruit in baking dish; pour the
batter over it, and bake.

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING.  MRS. W. C. BUTCHER.

Four cups of flour, four [one?] cups of sweet milk, one-half cup of
sugar, one half cup of molasses, three-fourths cup of chopped suet,
one cup of raisins, one-half cup of currants, one small teaspoonful of
salt, one heaping teaspoon of cinnamon, one heaping teaspoon of
cloves, one-half a nutmeg, and one teaspoon of soda; steam three
hours.  This can be kept any length of time.  When ready to use, cut
off slices and steam one-half hour.

ORANGE PUDDING.  MRS. W. C. RAPP AND MISS NELLIE LINSLEY.

Seed and slice five large oranges; pour over them a cup of sugar.
Take one pint of boiling milk; add yolks of three eggs, one-half cup
of sugar, a tablespoon of corn starch; boil until it thickens; when
nearly cold, pour over the oranges.  Beat whites of the eggs with a
little sugar; spread over the top, and brown in oven.

OCEANICA PUDDING.  MRS. NED THATCHER.

One pint of bread crumbs, one quart of milk, one cup of sugar, four
eggs (yolks), butter the size of an egg, grated rind of one lemon;
mix, and bake until done, but not watery.  Beat the whites of three
eggs with one cup of sugar, into which has been stirred the juice of
one lemon.  Spread over the pudding a layer of jelly and the whites of
eggs.  Replace in oven until a nice brown.  Serve with sauce.

PUDDING.  M. E. B.

One pint of flour, one heaping teaspoon of baking powder, one egg, a
pinch of salt, one-half a cup of butter, one-half a cup of sugar; mix
with water or sweet milk to form a thick batter.  Fill a pan one-half
full of fruit, sweetened with sugar, and pour the mixture over it.
Put pan in a steamer, and steam one hour.  To be eaten with sauce.

PEACH PUDDING.  MRS. J. H. REED.

Fill a pudding dish with peaches, cooked and sweetened; pour over them
a batter made of one pint of sweet milk, four eggs, one cup of sugar,
one tablespoon of butter, a little salt, one teaspoon of baking
powder, and two cups of flour.  Place in oven, and bake until a rich
brown.  Serve with cream.

COLD CUSTARD MADE WITH RENNET.  MRS. IRA UHLER.

Use a piece of rennet about the size of a half dollar.  Take two
quarts of good sweet milk, and warm it to the heat of new milk;
sweeten to taste; flavor with nutmeg.  Soak the rennet in three or
four tablespoons of warm water a few moments; then place it in the
middle of the pan of milk (with a string attached, and laid out over
the edge of the pan, so that it can be removed without breaking the
custard); set in a cool place until solid.  Serve with cream.  This is
a very delicate dish for invalids.

POTATO PUDDING.  MRS. J. F. McNEAL.

One and one-half pints of mashed potato, one teacup of sugar, one-half
cup of butter, one cup of flour, one quart of milk, four eggs, and
salt to taste.  Flavor with lemon, nutmeg, or vanilla.  Bake one hour.

QUEEN PUDDING.  MRS. T. J. McMURRAY.

One pint of bread crumbs, one quart of milk, one cup of sugar, the
yolks of four eggs, the grated rind of one lemon, and a piece of
butter the size of a hen’s egg.  Bake like a custard.  When done,
cover with the whites of the eggs, beaten to a stiff froth with one
cup of sugar and the juice of the lemon.  Put back in oven, and brown
lightly.

RICE PUDDING.  MRS. ELIZA DICKERSON.

Wash a small cup of rice, and put into a quart of milk; season to
taste; add one cup of raisins, and set in oven three hours before
dinner.  When the mixture begins to brown on top, stir up from the
bottom, repeating this until the pudding is done.  If it becomes too
dry, add more milk.

PRESBYTERIAN PUDDING.  MRS. J. EDD THOMAS.

Stew prunes, or any small fruit, sweeten to taste, and while boiling
put in a few thin slices of white bread; when the bread is saturated
with the boiling juice, put the bread in alternate layers in a deep
dish, leaving a thick layer of fruit for the top.  Put a plate over
the top, and when cool, set on ice.  Serve with sugar and cream.
Whipped cream is preferable.

PEACH TAPIOCA.  MRS. S. E. BARLOW.

Cover one cup of “Farina” tapioca with a pint of water, allowing it to
soak until all the water has been absorbed. Open a pint can of
peaches, and pour off the liquor; add to this the tapioca, and cook
slowly over a moderate fire until the tapioca is clear and tender;
then stir in the peaches. Turn into a dish, and serve cold, with
powdered sugar and cream.  Cherries, unfermented grape juice, or
berries can be used instead of peaches, and will make a most delicious
dessert.

TAPIOCA CREAM.  MRS. O. W. WEEKS.

Soak one teacup of tapioca in water over night.  In the morning, set
one quart of milk in a kettle of boiling water, and let it come to a
boil.  Stir the yolks of three eggs into the tapioca, with one cup of
sugar; let it boil a few minutes.  Beat the whites of the eggs stiff
and put on the top of the cream.  Serve cold.

TAPIOCA PUDDING, WITH APPLES.  MRS. DR. FISHER.

Soak one teacup of tapioca and one teaspoon of salt in one and
one-half pints of cold water for five hours; keep in a warm place but
do not cook.  Two hours before dinner, pare and core six large apples;
place them in a pudding dish; fill the cavities made by removing cores
with sugar and a little grated nutmeg, or lemon peel; add a cup of
water, and bake one hour, turning the apples to prevent them drying.
When quite soft, turn over them the tapioca.  Bake one hour longer.
Serve with hard sauce of butter and sugar.

SUET PUDDING.  MRS. FRED. SHAEFFER.

One cup of molasses, one cup of sweet milk, one cup of suet (chopped
fine), or a half cup of butter, one cup of raisins, half cup of
currants, two and a half cups of flour, and a teaspoon of soda; mix
well; add a pinch of salt, one teaspoonful allspice, and one teaspoon
of cinnamon.  Steam two hours.

SUET PUDDING.  MRS. WILDBAHN.

One cup of suet (chopped fine), one cup molasses, one cup raisins
(seeded), one cup sweet milk, three cups flour, one large teaspoon
soda, a little salt; mix, and steam three and one-half to four hours.
Serve with drawn butter sauce.

STEAMED SUET PUDDING.  MRS. R. H. JOHNSON AND MRS. J. C. WALTER.

One cup of suet (chopped fine), one cup of sugar, one cup milk, one
cup chopped raisins, three cups flour, with two teaspoonfuls baking
powder, a little salt; spice to taste; mix, and steam three hours.

SAUCE.–One cup of sugar, one-half cup of butter (beaten to a cream),
one tablespoonful of water, the yolk of one egg; heat to a scald; add
the white of egg, well beaten, with a pinch of salt.  Flavor with
lemon.

SUET PUDDING.  MRS. C. C. CAMPBELL.

Two cups or suet (chopped fine), two cups of stoned raisins, four cups
flour, two eggs, a pinch of salt, milk enough to make a stiff batter;
put in a pudding bag, and boil three hours.

SAUCE FOR PUDDING.–One cup of sugar, one half cup water, yolk of one
egg, one teaspoonful butter, one teaspoonful flour.  Flavor with
lemon.

SUET PUDDING.  MRS. P. O. SHARPLESS.

One and a half cups suet, chopped very fine and mixed thoroughly with
three cups of flour; one tablespoonful of cinnamon, one cup molasses
or sugar, and one cup sour milk.  If sugar is used, mix with the flour
and suet; if molasses, mix with the sour milk, to which add one
rounded teaspoonful of soda.  Add, at the last, one large cupful of
seeded raisins and one-half cup currants.  Steam at least two hours.

TROY PUDDING.  MRS. GEO. TURNER.

One cup of raisins, one cup of New Orleans molasses, one cup of beef
suet; one cup of sweet milk, three cups of flour, one teaspoonful of
soda, one teaspoonful each of ground cloves, ginger, and cinnamon,
saltspoon of salt; mix; pour in pudding pan, and steam from four to
six hours.  Serve very hot, with sauce to suit taste.  When taken from
steamer, set in oven a moment to dry the top.  This rule makes three
small loaves.  It will keep to warm over when needed.