Recipes for Fowl And Game

FOWL AND GAME.

“And then to breakfast with what appetite you have.”
                                                        –SHAKESPEARE.

ACCOMPANIMENTS FOR FOWLS.

With boiled fowls, bread sauce, onion sauce, lemon sauce, cranberry
sauce, jellies, and cream sauce.

With roast turkey, cranberry sauce, currant jelly.

With boiled turkey, oyster sauce.

With wild ducks, cucumber sauce, currant jelly, or cranberry sauce.

With roast goose or venison, grape jelly, or cranberry sauce.

A GOOD WAY TO COOK CHICKEN.  MRS. R. H. JOHNSON.

Fricassee your chicken, taking care to brown the skin nicely; season
to taste.  When done set by to cool; then remove all the bones; put
back into the liquor in which it was cooked; chop fine, leaving in all
the oil of the fowl. If not enough of the oil, add a piece of butter;
then pack closely in a dish as you wish it to go to the table.

DROP DUMPLINGS FOR VEAL OR CHICKEN.  MRS. R. H. JOHNSON.

One full pint of sifted flour, two even teaspoonfuls of yeast powder,
and a little salt.  Wet this with enough milk or water to drop from
spoon in a ball; remove your meat or chicken; drop in the balls of
dough; cook five minutes in the liquor; place around the edge of
platter, with the chicken or meat in center; season the liquor and
pour over it.

JELLIED CHICKEN.  MRS. R. H. J.

Boil the fowl until the meat will slip easily from the bones; reduce
the water to one pint.  Pick the meat from the bones in good-sized
pieces; leave out all the fat and gristle, and place in a wet mold.
Skim all the fat from the liquor; add one-half box of gelatine, a
little butter, pepper and salt.  When the gelatine is dissolved, pour
all over the chicken while hot.  Season well.  Serve cold, cut in
slices.

FRIED CHICKEN.  MRS. J. ED. THOMAS.

Kill the fowls the night before; clean, cut and set on ice until
needed the next day.  Flour and sprinkle with salt and pepper; pour
boiling water over it, and stew three-quarters of an hour.  Add
sufficient butter to fry a light brown.

CHICKEN PIE.

Take a pair of young, tender chickens and cut them into neat joints.
Lay them in a deep pudding-dish, arranging them so that the pile shall
be higher in the middle than at the sides.  Reserve the pinions of the
wings, the necks, and the feet, scalding the latter and scraping off
the skin.  Make small forcemeat balls of fine bread crumbs seasoned
with pepper, salt, parsley, a suspicion of grated lemon peel, and a
raw egg.  Make this into little balls with the hands, and lay them
here and there in the pie.  Pour in a cupful of cold water, cover the
pie with a good crust, making a couple of cuts in the middle of this,
and bake in a steady oven for an hour and a quarter.  Lay a paper over
the pie if it should brown too quickly.  Soak a tablespoonful of
gelatine for an hour in enough cold water to cover it.  Make a gravy
of the wings, feet, and necks of the fowls, seasoning it highly;
dissolve the gelatine in this, and when the pie is done pour this
gravy into it through a small funnel inserted in the opening in the
top.  The pie should not be cut until it is cold.  This is nice for
picnics.

CHICKEN PIE.  MRS. M. A. MOORHEAD.

Stew the chicken until tender.  Line a pan with crust made as you
would baking powder biscuit.  Alternate a layer of chicken and pieces
of the crust until the pan is filled; add a little salt and pepper to
each layer; fill with the broth in which the chicken was cooked; bake
until the crust is done.  If you bake the bottom crust before filling,
it will only be necessary to bake until the top crust is done. A layer
of stewed chicken and a layer of oysters make a delicious pie.  Use
the same crust.

DROP DUMPLINGS FOR STEWED CHICKEN.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Stew chicken and make a rich gravy with milk or cream.  Pour off a
part into a separate vessel and thin with water; let it boil, then
drop in dumplings made with this proportion:  One quart flour, a
little salt, one egg, two teaspoonfuls baking powder, and milk to make
a stiff batter.  Stir, and drop from spoon into boiling gravy.  Cover,
and let boil gently for five minutes.  Try them with a fork.  They
must be perfectly dry inside when done.  Serve with the chicken.

CHICKEN ON BISCUIT.  MRS. H. T. VAN FLEET.

Have prepared for cooking a nice fat fowl about a year old; season
with pepper and salt, and boil two hours, or until very tender.  When
done there should be a quart of broth.  If there is not that quantity,
boiling water should be added.  Beat together very smoothly two
heaping tablespoonfuls of flour with the yolk of one egg and one-third
pint of cold water; add this to broth, stirring briskly all the time;
add one tablespoonful of butter.  Have ready a pan of hot biscuit;
break them open and lay halves on platter, crust down; pour chicken
and gravy over biscuit, and serve immediately .

ROAST TURKEY.  MRS. J. F. MC NEAL.

Prepare the dressing as follows:  Three coffeecups of bread crumbs,
made very fine; one teaspoonful salt, half teaspoonful pepper, one
tablespoonful powdered sage, one teacup melted butter, one egg; mix
all together thoroughly.  With this dressing stuff the body and
breast, and sew with a strong thread.  Take two tablespoonfuls of
melted butter, two of flour; mix to a paste.  Rub the turkey with salt
and pepper; then spread the paste over the entire fowl, with a few
thin slices of sweet bacon.  Roll the fowl loosely in a piece of clean
linen or muslin; tie it up; put it in the oven, and baste every
fifteen minutes till done.  Remove cloth a few moments before taking
turkey from oven.  A young turkey requires about two hours; an old one
three or four hours.  This can be tested with fork.  Thicken the
drippings with two tablespoonfuls of browned flour, mixed with one cup
sweet cream.

OYSTER SAUCE TO BE USED WITH THE TURKEY.–Take one quart of oysters;
put them into stew pan; add half cup butter; pepper and salt to taste;
cover closely; let come to a boil, and serve with the turkey and
dressing.

TURKEY AND DRESSING.  MRS. U. F. SEFFNER.

A good-sized turkey should be baked two and one-half or three hours,
very slowly at first.  Turkey one year old is considered best.  See
that it is well cleaned and washed.  Salt and pepper it inside.  Take
one and a half loaves of stale bread (bakers preferred) and crumble
fine.  Put into frying pan a lump of butter the size of an egg; cut
into this one white onion; cook a few moments, but do not brown.  Stir
into this the bread, with one teaspoon of salt and one of pepper; let
it heat thoroughly; fill the turkey; put in roaster; salt and pepper
the outside; dredge with flour and pour over one cup water.

BONED TURKEY.  MRS. R. H. J.

Boil a turkey in as little water as possible until the bones can be
easily separated from the meat; remove all the skin; slice, mixing
together the light and dark parts; season with salt and pepper.  Take
the liquor in which the fowl was boiled, having kept it warm; pour it
on the meat; mix well; shape it like a loaf of bread; wrap in a cloth
and press with a heavy weight for a few hours.  Cut in thin slices
when served.

ROAST DUCKS AND GEESE.

Use any filling you prefer; season with sage and onion, chopped fine;
Salt and pepper.  (You can use this seasoning with mashed potatoes for
a stuffing).  Young ducks should roast from twenty-five to thirty
minutes; full grown ones for two hours.  Baste frequently.  Serve with
currant jelly, apple sauce and green peas.  If the fowls are old
parboil before roasting.

APPLE STUFFING.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Take one-half pint of apple sauce (unsweetened); add one half cup or
more of bread crumbs, some powdered sage, a little chopped onion, and
season with cayenne pepper.  Delicious for roast geese, ducks, etc.

CHESTNUT DRESSING.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Boil the chestnuts and shell them; blanch them, and boil until soft;
mix with bread crumbs and sweet cream; salt and pepper; one cup
raisins.  Excellent dressing for turkey.

PLAIN STUFFING.

Take stale bread; cut off the crust; rub very fine, and pour over it
as much melted butter as will make it crumble in your hand.  Salt and
pepper to taste.  To this you can add one good-sized onion (chopped
fine), a cup of raisins, or a little sage.

OYSTER DRESSING.

Make dressing same as above plain stuffing; add one egg and one-half
can drained oysters.  Strain the oyster liquor and use for basting the
fowl.

A GOOD SAUCE FOR BIRDS OR VENISON.

Chop an onion fine, and boil it in milk; when done, add the gravy from
the game, and thicken with pounded cracker.

POTTED PIGEONS OR BIRDS.

Pick, soak, and boil the birds with the same care as for roasting.
Make a crust as for chicken pie; lay the birds in whole, and season
with pepper, salt, bits of butter, and a little sweet marjoram; flour
them thickly; then strain the water in which they were boiled, and
fill up the vessel two-thirds full with it; cover with the crust; cut
hole in the center.  Bake one hour and a half.

PIGEONS AND PARTRIDGES.

These may be boiled or roasted the same as chickens, only cover the
breasts with thin slices of bacon; when nearly done, remove the bacon,
dredge with flour, and baste with butter.  They will cook in half an
hour.

RABBITS.  MRS. ECKHART.

Rabbits, which are best in mid-winter, may be fricasseed, like
chicken, in white or brown sauce.  Rabbit pie is made like chicken
pie.  To roast a rabbit, stuff with a dressing made of bread crumbs,
chopped salt pork, thyme, onion, pepper and salt; sew up; rub over
with a little butter, or pin on a few slices of salt pork; add a
little water, and baste often.  Rabbits may be fried as you would
steak, and served with a sour sauce made like a brown flour gravy,
with half a cup of vinegar added; pour over the fried rabbit, and
serve it with mashed potatoes.