Recipes for Breads

BREAD.

“The very staff of life; the comfort of the husband; the pride of the
wife.”

DRY YEAST.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

A large handful of hops put into one quart of water; cover, and let
boil five minutes; strain over one pint of flour; beat until your arm
aches, and the batter is smooth.  When cool, add a cake of good yeast.
When perfectly light, mix stiff with white corn meal, and a little
flour; roll out on the kneading board; cut in cakes, and dry.  Turn
them often.

EVER-READY YEAST.  MRS. W. H. E.

Four good-sized perfect potatoes; pare and grate them quickly.  Pour
boiling water over the grated potato until it thickens like starch;
let cool a few moments; then stir in flour to thicken.  When milk
warm, put in one or two cakes of dry yeast, previously dissolved in a
cup of water; let stand twenty-four hours.  Use one pint of this with
four pints of water for four loaves of bread.  Make the sponge either
at bed time, or early in the morning.   Will keep in a cool place two
weeks.

SWEET YEAST.  MRS. SUSIE SEFFNER.

Boil four large potatoes in two quarts of water.  When done, mash the
potatoes, and add one cup of sugar, one-half cup of salt, one-half cup
of flour.  Boil one pint of hops in the water in which the potatoes
were boiled until strength is out; then strain in the jar with other
ingredients; stir well.  When cool, add one cup of yeast, or one cake
of dry yeast; let raise, and put in jar.  Keep in cool place.

GOOD BREAD.  MRS. SUSIE SEFFNER.

Take six good-sized potatoes; cook until very soft; take from the
water, and mash until creamy; turn the water over the potato scalding
hot, and stir in flour until the consistency of cake batter.  When
cool, stir in one cup of good yeast dissolved in a little warm water;
let rise over night.  First thing in the morning, heat two quarts of
water milk warm; add to the yeast; then stir in flour to make a thick
sponge; let rise; then work to a stiff dough; let rise again; knead
down; let rise again; make into loaves.  When light, bake from three
quarters to one hour.  This makes a large baking.

AN EASY WAY TO MAKE GOOD BREAD.  MRS. G. E. SALMON.

FOR THREE LOAVES.–Take three medium-sized potatoes; boil, and mash
fine; add two tablespoons of flour; scald with potato water; add one
tablespoon of salt, one of lard, and two of sugar.  Have one quart of
this, and when lukewarm, add one cake of yeast, dissolved.  Prepare
this at noon; let stand till morning, stirring two or three times.
In the morning, have the flour warm; mix till stiff enough to knead on
the board, and knead thoroughly for half an hour; rub melted lard over
top, and set in a warm place to rise.  When light, make into loaves,
handling as little as possible; rub melted lard over top, and let rise
again.  Bake fifty minutes.  When taken from the oven, rub the tops of
loaves over with butter.  This will keep the crust soft.

COFFEE CAKE.  MRS. U. F. SEFFNER.

When the bread is ready for the pans, leave about what you would use
for one loaf in the bowl; into that, work one-half cup butter,
one-half cup sugar, the yolks of two eggs, and the white of one egg;
work thoroughly; set to rise. When light, handle carefully; don’t work
or roll it; make into cakes with the hands; put into pie plates;
grease the tops with butter; sprinkle on fine bread crumbs, sugar, and
cinnamon, mixed.  When perfectly light, bake twenty or twenty-five
minutes.

BREAD.  MRS. BELLE BLAND.

FOR FOUR LOAVES OF BREAD.–Peel five good-sized potatoes; boil until
soft, and mash through a colander; then two tablespoonfuls of sugar,
one of salt; and five pints of water.  When about cold, add one-half
medium-sized cakes of yeast, which have been well soaked.  Let this
stand in a warm place twenty-four hours.  In the morning, mix stiff;
knead well; let it rise until light; mold into loaves, and when raised
again, bake in a moderately hot oven one hour.

COMMUNION BREAD.  MRS. S. A. YOUNG.

Take one pint flour, one-half teaspoonful baking powder, a little
salt, a teaspoonful butter; rub all together, and then put in enough
water to make a stiff dough.  Cut dough in two pieces; roll to
thickness of heavy pie crust; lay on white paper, and cut into strips
one-fourth inch wide.  Bake between papers in slow oven.

CINNAMON BREAD.

Take flour as for making biscuit; add a cupful of yeast sponge, two
well beaten eggs, a quart of luke-warm water, and a cupful of sugar.
Salt and knead same as light dough and set to rise.   When it is ready
to make out, roll into thin cakes; place in well buttered pans and let
it rise again.  Bake to a light brown on top, and when done, spread a
cream over it, as follows:  White of an egg beaten to stiff froth; add
teaspoonful of ground cinnamon, and a tablespoonful of granulated
sugar.  When this is done, put the bread again in the oven to dry the
cream.  This is delicious.

GRAHAM BREAD.  MRS. A. C. AULT.

Two cups graham flour, one cup buttermilk, one-half cup sugar, one
egg, one teaspoonful soda, one tablespoonful butter, a pinch salt.

GRAHAM BREAD.

One cup sponge, one cup warm water, one-fourth cup molasses, two
tablespoons melted butter.  Thicken with equal quantities of graham,
and flour just enough to form a loaf; then raise.

BROWN BREAD.  MRS. MARY DICKERSON.

Three cups of sweet milk, three cups of graham flour, one and one-half
cups of corn meal, one cup of molasses, one teaspoon of salt, one
teaspoon of soda.  Steam for three hours in four one pound baking
powder cans, with the covers on.

BOSTON BROWN BREAD.  MRS. JOHN ROBINSON.

One and one-half pints sour milk, one cup baking molasses, two
teaspoonfuls soda (one in the milk, one in the molasses); beat well
before putting together.  One teaspoonful salt, four cups graham
flour, one teaspoonful baking powder in the flour.  Steam two and
one-half hours; remove the lids, and set in the oven one-half hour.
Five canfuls.

BOSTON BROWN BREAD.  MRS. S. E. BARLOW.

One and one-half pints sour milk, one cup baking molasses, scant
teaspoon soda in each; foam separately.  Pour cups graham flour, one
teaspoon baking powder, one teaspoon salt.  Put in one pound baking
powder cans; steam two and one-half hours, and bake half hour.

CORN BREAD.  MRS. SAMUEL SAITER.

Mix together one and two-third cups corn meal, one-third cup flour,
one-fourth cup sugar, one teaspoonful salt. Beat two eggs until light,
and add to them one cup sour milk, and one cup sweet milk in which one
teaspoonful soda has been dissolved; mix thoroughly.  Have the frying
pan very hot, with two tablespoonfuls butter; pour the batter into it;
then pour into this mixture another cup of sweet milk, but do not stir
the cake.  Place pan into hot oven, and bake one-half hour.

CORN BREAD.  MRS. SALMON.

Two heaping cups corn meal, one heaping cup flour, two teaspoons
baking powder sifted with flour, whites and yolks of three eggs beaten
separately, two and one-half cups sweet milk, one tablespoon melted
butter, one tablespoon white sugar, one teaspoon salt.  Bake steadily
in a moderately hot oven.

CORN BREAD.  MRS. A. C. AULT.

One and one-half pints corn meal, one-half pint flour, one
tablespoonful sugar, one teaspoonful salt, two heaping teaspoons
baking powder, one tablespoonful lard, one and one-fourth pints milk,
two eggs.  Sift together corn meal, flour, sugar, salt, and baking
powder; rub in lard cold; add the egg; mix to a moderately stiff
batter.  Bake in rather hot oven thirty minutes.

CORN BREAD.  MRS. C. H. WILLIAMS.

Two cups sweet milk, one egg, one and one-half teacups wheat flour,
two teacups Indian meal, two tablespoonfuls sugar, a little salt, four
teaspoonfuls cream tartar put in with flour, two teaspoonfuls soda
dissolved in warm water; add this last.  Bake in gem pans in a quick
oven.

Darmody & McClures Premium Corn Meal should be used with these
recipes.

CORN BREAD.  MRS. F. E. H. SELLERS.

One pint buttermilk, one pint corn meal, one pint flour, one
teaspoonful salt, two teaspoonfuls soda in milk, six tablespoonfuls
molasses, one egg.  Bake in slow oven thirty minutes.

STEAMED CORN BREAD.  MRS. CHAS. MOORE.

Two cupfuls new milk, two cupfuls Indian meal, one and one-half
cupfuls flour, two-thirds cupful New Orleans molasses, one scant
teaspoon soda.  Mix flour, meal, and salt together thoroughly; then
add milk, and beat till smooth.  Dissolve soda in molasses; add to
mixture; then put in buttered pan; steam three hours, setting steamer
over cold water.  Put in oven fifteen minutes.

POTATO RUSKS.  MRS. E. S. JORDAN.

Six good-sized potatoes cooked soft and then mashed, one-half cup
butter and one-half cup lard mixed, one cup sugar, one-half cup cooled
potato water, two tablespoons flour, one cup yeast.  Mix the above;
let rise, and then beat three eggs; put in, and work up.

PENN RUSKS.  MRS. A. C. AULT.

One large potato.  Make sponge same as bread in the evening.  In the
morning, add one pint of sweet milk, one cup white sugar, one-half cup
butter, and more flour.  Let rise again; knead out soft; let rise
again; cut out; put in pans; let rise once more.  Bake fifteen
minutes.

Best results obtained by using “ELECTRIC LIGHT FLOUR.”