Recipes for Pickles

PICKLES.

“Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.”
                                                       –MOTHER GOOSE.

FOR SIX HUNDRED PICKLES.  MRS. M. E. WRIGHT.

Make a brine of cold water and salt strong enough to bear up an egg;
heat boiling hot, and pour over pickles; let stand twenty-four hours;
then take out, and wipe dry.  Scald vinegar, and put over; let stand
twenty-four hours; then pour off, and to fresh vinegar add one quart
brown sugar, two large green peppers, one-half pint white mustard
seed, six cents worth ginger root, six cents worth cinnamon and
allspice, one tablespoon celery seed, alum size butternut.  Scald,
pour over, and tie up in jars.

CUCUMBER PICKLES.  MRS. H. T. VAN FLEET.

Pour enough boiling water over pickles to cover them, and let stand
twenty-four hours; measure water so that you may know what quantity of
vinegar to use.  Take them out of water, wiping each one separately
with dry towel; place in close layers in stone jar.  To one gallon of
vinegar, add one cup of salt, two tablespoons of pulverized alum, same
of cloves, allspice, mustard, and cinnamon; put all in vinegar, and
let come to boil; pour this over pickles.  When cool, place plate
over, and add a weight.  Pickles prepared in this way will keep nicely
a year.

CHOW-CHOW.  MRS. ALICE KRANER.

One quart green cucumbers (cut lengthwise), one dozen small cucumbers
(whole), one dozen small onions, one large cauliflower, one quart
small green tomatoes.  Put the cucumbers in brine for three days; the
rest scald in salt and water; add pepper and other spices to taste.
Two and one-half quarts vinegar, two and one-half cups sugar, one cup
flour, six tablespoonfuls mustard.  Scald the vinegar, sugar, flour,
and mustard.  Pour this over the whole bottle; and seal.

CHOW-CHOW.  MRS. C. C. STOLTZ.

Two quarts small cucumbers, two quarts small onions, two cauliflowers,
six green peppers; cut all, and put in salt and water four hours; then
scald, and drain.

PASTE.–Six tablespoonfuls mustard, one tablespoonful turmeric, one
and one-half cups sugar, one cup flour.  Mix all well together; add
cold vinegar to wet it up; pour into two quarts of boiling vinegar.

Pour this on pickles; mix thoroughly, and put in cans.

PICKLED ONIONS.  MRS. DR. FISHER.

Peel small white onions, and boil them in milk and water ten minutes;
drain off the milk and water, and pour over the onions scalding spiced
vinegar.

PICKLED PEACHES.  MRS. DR. FISHER.

Wipe ripe but hard peaches until free from down; stick a few cloves
into each one; lay in cold spiced vinegar.  In three months, they will
be nicely pickled, and retain much of their natural flavor.

MANGO PICKLES.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

[In this recipe, the term “mango” refers to green bell peppers.]  Use
either small muskmelons or sweet peppers; take out the insides, and
lay them in strong salt water twenty-four hours; drain well.  For
filling, cut cabbage fine; salt it; let it stand one hour; wash with
clear water, and drain well; add celery seed and ground cinnamon to
taste.  Fill the mangoes; tie closely; pack in stone jars.  Then to
one gallon of good cider vinegar, add three pounds of brown sugar;
heat, and pour over the mangoes; repeat the heating of vinegar two or
three mornings in succession.

MIXED PICKLES.  MAUD STOLTZ.

Two hundred little cucumbers, fifty large cucumbers, three
tablespoonfuls black mustard seed, three tablespoonfuls white mustard
seed, three tablespoonfuls celery seed, one dozen red peppers, two
pounds sugar, one quart French mustard, one bottle English chow-chow,
one quart little onions, vinegar to cover.  Cook slowly for one hour.

TOMATO CHOW-CHOW.  MRS. A. H. KLING.

One-half peck green tomatoes, two large heads of cabbage, fifteen
onions, twenty-five ripe cucumbers, one pint of grated horseradish,
one-half pound of white mustard seed, one ounce of celery seed,
one-half teacup each of ground pepper, turmeric, and cinnamon.  Cut
tomatoes, cabbage, onions, and cucumbers in small pieces, and salt
over night.  In the morning, drain off the brine; put on vinegar and
water, half and half; let stand twenty-four hours; drain again; put in
the spices.  Boil two gallons of vinegar with three pounds of brown
sugar; pour over while hot; do this three mornings; then add one-half
pound of mustard; stir in when nearly cold.

SPANISH PICKLE.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Four heads of cabbage, one peck of green tomatoes, one dozen large
cucumbers, one-half dozen sweet peppers (red), one-half dozen sweet
peppers (green), one quart of small white onions; cut all these in
small pieces, and let stand in brine over night; wash in cold water,
and drain.  Cut six bunches of celery in small pieces.

DRESSING FOR THE PICKLE.–Two gallons of good cider vinegar, five
pounds of brown sugar, five cents worth of turmeric, five cents worth
of white mustard seed, one-half pound of ground mustard, one-half cup
of flour, a tablespoon of whole cloves, and the same of stick
cinnamon.

Let the vinegar, sugar, and all the spices come to boiling point; add
the chopped vegetables, and one hundred small cucumber pickles that
have been in brine over night. Cook one-half hour; then add the
turmeric, ground mustard and flour mixed to a paste; cook five minutes
longer.  Bottle, and eat when your stomach craves it.

CELERY, OR FRENCH PICKLE.  MRS. F. E. BLAKE.

One gallon each of chopped (very fine) cabbage, celery and sweet
peppers; one cupful of salt over peppers after being chopped; mix
well; let stand two hours; wash thoroughly till water is clear to
prevent coloring cabbage and celery.  Mix together cabbage, celery,
and peppers; to this add one tablespoonful of salt, one pint of white
mustard seed (not ground), four pints of sugar, hot peppers to suit
the taste.  Put in jars for immediate use; in sealed cans to keep.  Be
fore putting away, add one gallon of good cider vinegar, cold.

GREEN TOMATO PICKLE.  MRS. F. R. SAITER.

Slice one peck of green tomatoes, and four green peppers; place in a
stone jar in layers, sprinkling each layer thickly with salt; cover
with boiling water; let stand over night; drain in the morning through
a colander, and add four large onions sliced, with an ounce of whole
cloves, one ounce of cinnamon, two pounds of brown sugar.  Place all
together in a preserving kettle; nearly cover with vinegar; boil slow
until tender.  Set away in a jar.  Next day, if the syrup seems thin,
drain off, and boil down.  Cover top of jar with a cloth before
setting away.

CUCUMBER PICKLES.  KITTIE M. SMITH.

Wash your cucumbers; then pour boiling water on them, and let them
stand eighteen hours.  Take them out, and make a brine of one pint of
salt to one gallon of water; pour on boiling hot; let stand
twenty-four hours.  Then wipe them dry, and pack them in your jar.
Put in slips of horseradish, and what spices you like.  Cover with
cold cider vinegar. Put grape leaves on the top.  They are ready to
use in twenty-four hours, and if the vinegar is pure cider vinegar,
will keep indefinitely.

CHOPPED PICKLE.  MRS. S. A. POWERS.

One peck green tomatoes, one dozen red sweet peppers, chopped fine;
cover with salt water; let stand twenty-four hours; drain dry; add one
head cabbage, one bunch celery chopped fine, one pint grated
horseradish, one teacupful cloves, one teacupful black mustard seed,
salt to taste, one pint or more very small cucumbers, or one-half
dozen ordinary cucumbers cut into small strips; cover with cold cider
vinegar.  If desired to keep, seal in self sealers.

CURRANT CATSUP.  MRS. E.

Five quarts juice, three pounds sugar; boil juice and sugar until it
thickens; then add one pint vinegar, tablespoon ground cinnamon and
cloves, teaspoon each of salt and pepper; bottle for use.  You can use
grape juice.

FLINT PICKLES.  MRS. LAURA MARTIN EVERETT.

Use medium-sized cucumbers; wash clean, and lay in jars. Make a brine
of water and salt–one teacup of salt to a gallon of water; boil, and
pour over the cucumbers; move brine nine mornings in succession; boil,
and pour over; then wash in hot water, and put to drain.  When cool,
place in stone jars, one layer of pickles, and then a layer of grape
leaves, some horseradish, and a few sliced onions, if you like the
taste of onion.  When your jars are full, make a syrup of good vinegar
and sugar, sweetened to taste, and add stick of cinnamon, a little
celery seed; boil, and pour over the pickles.  Invert a plate or
saucer, and put on a small weight; tie up closely.  They will keep the
year round, and are very palatable.

TOMATO CATSUP.  MRS. G. LIVINGSTON.

One gallon strained tomatoes, one quart good vinegar, one tablespoon
each cloves, mustard, and cinnamon, a little salt, one teaspoon red
pepper; cook one hour, and bottle.

TOMATO CATSUP.  MRS. ALICE KRANER.

Two and one-half gallons ripe tomatoes; rub through a sieve; eight
cups cider vinegar, one and one-half cups salt, two and one-half cups
brown sugar, nine teaspoonfuls mustard, four teaspoonfuls ginger, five
teaspoonfuls allspice, five teaspoonfuls cloves, five teaspoonfuls
black pepper, four teaspoonfuls cayenne pepper.

COLD CATSUP.  MRS. F. E. BLAKE.

One peck of tomatoes, sliced fine; sprinkle with salt lightly, and let
stand two hours; rub through coarse sieve or colander; to this, add
one-half pint grated horseradish, one large cup salt, one and one-half
cups white mustard seed, one tablespoonful black pepper, one quart
fine chopped celery, one large teacupful chopped onions, one and
one-half cups sugar, one tablespoonful ground cloves, one
tablespoonful ground cinnamon, three pints good cider vinegar.  Mix
cold, and use immediately, or can, and it will keep for years.

COMMON CATSUP.  MRS. F. E. BLAKE.

Cut up tomatoes, skins and all; cook thoroughly.  When cool, rub
through a sieve.  To one gallon of tomato juice, put a tablespoonful
of salt, one tablespoonful of pepper, one tablespoonful of cinnamon,
and one quart of good cider vinegar.  Cook until thick.

GOOSEBERRY CATSUP.  EVELYN GAILEY.

Six quarts berries, nine pounds sugar, one pint vinegar, one
tablespoonful each of cloves, cinnamon, and allspice.  One-half the
vinegar put on berries at first.  When nearly done, strain, and add
rest of the vinegar, and spices.  Boil three or four hours.

SPICED GRAPES.  MRS. G. A. LIVINGSTON.

One pound of fruit, one-half pound of sugar, one pint of vinegar, two
teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, two teaspoonfuls of cloves, one teaspoonful
of allspice.  Cook pulp and skins separately.

PICKLED PEARS.  MRS. F. E. BLAKE.

To one gallon of moderately strong vinegar, add a small handful of
cloves (not ground), several sticks of cinnamon, sugar enough to make
vinegar quite sweet.  Take small pears, and with a small pointed knife
remove all blemishes, but do not pare them.  Put vinegar on the stove.
When it comes to a boil, fill kettle as full of pears as will boil;
set on back of stove, and boil slowly for three and one-half hours;
fill your cans, and seal while very hot.

ROSA’S SWEET PICKLE.

Nine pounds peaches, three pounds sugar, three quarts good cider
vinegar.  Peel the peaches; then put them with the sugar and vinegar
in a porcelain lined kettle; cook for five to ten minutes; put two
cloves in each peach; add a little whole allspice.

SPICED GRAPES.  MRS. ELIZA CORWIN, MT. GILEAD, OHIO.

Wash the bunches carefully.  Use two or three gallon jars.  Put a
thick layer of brown sugar on bottom of jar; then a layer of bunches
of grapes; sprinkle on a few whole cloves, allspice, and stick
cinnamon.  Alternate layers of sugar and grapes as above until jar is
full.  Turn plate on top; put on weight; tie cloth closely over top;
put in cool place.  The grapes are nice served with cold meats.  The
syrup can be used for cake, puddings, mince pies, etc.  Towards
spring, strain all that is left in the jar through a flannel cloth;
bottle it, and use through summer; use for dysentery.  A few spoonfuls
in ice water makes a pleasant drink for hot days.

SPICED GOOSEBERRIES.  MRS. C. C. CAMPBELL.

Six quarts berries, nine pounds sugar.  Cook one and one-half hours;
then add one pint vinegar, one teaspoonful cloves, one tablespoonful
cinnamon, one tablespoonful allspice.

CHILI SAUCE.  MRS. M. E. WRIGHT.

Twenty-four ripe tomatoes, eight onions, twelve green peppers, four
tablespoons salt, eight tablespoons sugar, two tablespoons cinnamon,
two tablespoons ginger, one tablespoon cloves, four teacups vinegar;
boil slowly two hours.