Recipes for Pies

PIES.

“Who dare deny the truth, there’s poetry in pie?”
                                                         –Longfellow.
There are plenty of women capable of choosing good husbands (or, if
not good when chosen, of making them good); yet these same women may
be ignorant on the subject of making good pie.  Ingenuity, good
judgement, and great care should be used in making all kinds of
pastry.  Use very cold water, and just as little as possible; roll
thin, and always from you; prick the bottom crust with a fork to
prevent blistering; then brush it well with the white of egg, and
sprinkle thick with granulated sugar.  This will give you a firm, rich
crust.

For all kinds of fruit pies, prepare the bottom crust as above.  Stew
the fruit, and sweeten to taste.  If juicy, put a good layer of corn
starch on top of the fruit before putting on the top crust.  This will
prevent the juice from running out, and will form a nice jelly
throughout the pie.  Be sure that you have plenty of incisions in the
top crust; then pinch it closely around the edge; sprinkle some
granulated sugar on top, and bake in a moderate oven.

PIE CRUST.  MRS. ELIZA DICKERSON.

With one cup of flour, use one tablespoonful of lard, and a little
salt; cut the lard into the flour with a knife; use just enough cold
water to stick it together; handle as little as possible.  If wanted
richer, add some butter when rolling out.

CUSTARD PIE.  FLORENCE ECKHART.

PASTRY.–Take one cup shortening (lard and butter mixed); three cups
of flour, a little salt; sift the flour; add the salt, and rub in the
shortening.  Use enough ice water to hold all together, handling as
little as possible.  Roll from you.  One-third the quantity given is
enough for one pie.

FILLING.–Yolks of four eggs, one quart of milk, a little salt, and
one-half cup of sugar.  Bake with under crust only.  Flavor to taste.

ORANGE CREAM PIE.  MRS. P. G. HARVEY AND MRS. W. C. RAPP.

Beat thoroughly the yolks of two eggs with one-half cup of sugar; add
one heaping tablespoon of flour, and one even tablespoon of corn
starch, dissolved in a little milk; pour into one pint of boiling
milk, and let cook about three minutes; cool; flavor with extract of
orange, and pour into a baked crust.  Beat the whites to a stiff
froth; add one-half cup of sugar; flavor with extract of orange;
spread on top; put in oven and let it slightly brown.

CHESS PIE.  IVA FISH.

Three-fourths cup of sugar; butter the size of an egg, yolks of three
eggs, one tablespoon of flour, one pint of milk; flavor with nutmeg.
beat all well together; heat the custard to near boiling; fill pie and
bake.  Put white of eggs on top; sprinkle with sugar and brown in
oven.

CREAM PIE.  MISS LOURIE, NEW YORK.

One cup of sour cream, one cup of sugar, one cup seeded and chopped
raisins, one egg and a pinch of salt.  Bake with two crusts.

CREAM PIE.  MRS. A. C. AULT.

One cup of milk, one-half cup of sugar, one tablespoonful of corn
starch, yolks of two eggs.  Cook milk, sugar, and eggs together; then
stir in the corn starch, and put into baked crust.

MERINGUE.–Whites of two eggs, well beaten with two tablespoonfuls of
sugar.  Spread on the pie and bake a light brown.

CORN STARCH PIE.  MRS. E. A. SEFFNER.

One tablespoonful of corn starch, two tablespoons of sugar, two
tablespoons of sweet milk, yolks of two eggs; beat all together in a
warm crock; stir in a pint of boiling milk; let it boil up once; then
add a teaspoon of vanilla or lemon and a pinch of salt; pour this into
a baked crust.  Beat the white of eggs with a teaspoonful of sugar;
put over pie, and brown quickly.

CHOCOLATE PIE.  MRS. ALICE KRANER.

Grate a tablespoonful of Bakers chocolate in a dish; add one
tablespoonful of flour, the yolks of two eggs, and one-half cup sugar;
beat all together; add one pint sweet milk.  Bake with lower crust.
Take the whites of eggs for frosting.  This will make one large pie.

LEMON PIE.  MRS. SUSIE B. DE WOLFE.

Grate the rind and squeeze the juice from two lemons; add two and
one-half cups of boiling water, three cups of sugar, one-half cup of
flour, the yolks of three eggs, and one tablespoon of butter; cook
until thick and clear; put in pans prepared with pastry, and bake.
Beat the whites of eggs with a little sugar; put over top, and brown
lightly.

LEMON PIE.  MRS. H. A. MARTIN.

One lemon, the yolks of two eggs, one heaping cup of sugar, butter the
size of a walnut, three cups of water.  Grate the rind of the lemon,
and squeeze out the pulp and juice; add the other ingredients; put in
a stew pan, and let come to a boil; then stir in one large
tablespoonful of corn starch, wet with cream.  Bake crust first, and
turn in filling.  Beat up the whites of two eggs, with a little pulver
ized sugar added, and put over the top.  Put in oven, and brown a
little.

LEMON PIE.  MRS. E. HUGHES.

Grate the rind of one smooth, juicy lemon, and squeeze out the juice,
straining it on the rind.  Put one cup of sugar and a piece of butter
the size of an egg in a bowl, and one good-sized cupful of boiling
water into a pan on the stove.  Moisten a tablespoonful of corn
starch, and stir it into the water; when it boils, pour it over the
sugar and butter, and stir in the rind and juice.  When a little coo],
add the beaten yolks of two eggs.  Butter a deep plate, and cover all
over with cracker dust (very fine crumbs).  This is the crust.  Pour
in the mixture, and bake; then frost with the whites (beaten stiff),
and brown.

LEMON PIE.  MRS. JENNIE KRAUSE.

One heaping tablespoon of corn starch, one cup of boiling water, one
cup of sugar, one egg, one tablespoon butter, and the juice and rind
of one small lemon.  Make into custard, and bake with bottom crust.

LEMON PIE.  MRS. G. M. BEICHER.

For one pie, take one lemon, one cup of sugar, yolks of two eggs, one
cup of water, and two heaping tablespoons of flour.  After the pie is
baked, beat the whites of the eggs with one tablespoon of sugar;
spread over pie, and brown in oven.

LEMON PIE.  MRS. MARY DICKERSON.

One cup of sugar, one large spoon of flour, the grated rind and juice
of one lemon, two eggs, a piece of butter as large as a hickory nut,
and two cups of boiling water; make into custard, reserving whites of
eggs for the top.

LEMON PIES.  MARY AULT.

For three pies, take one lemon, one egg, one tablespoonful of corn
starch, one and one-half cups of sugar, one and one-half cups of
water; boil all together for the custard.

CRUST.–One cup of lard, and a little salt, to three cups of flour.

LEMON PIE.  MRS. FENTON FISH.

Beat thoroughly the yolks of two eggs with one-half cup of sugar; add
one heaping tablespoon of flour, and one even tablespoon of corn
starch, dissolved in milk; pour into one pint of boiling milk, and let
cook about three minutes; add to this the juice and grated rind of one
lemon, and pour into a baked crust.  Beat the whites to a stiff froth;
add one-half cup of sugar; spread on top.  Put in oven, and let
slightly brown.

MINCE MEAT.  MRS. R. H. JOHNSON.

Chop fine four pounds of good boiled beef (one tongue is better), one
pound suet, and eight apples; add two pounds of raisins (seeded), two
pounds of currants, two grated nutmegs, two ounces ground cloves, one
pound citron (cut fine), two pounds brown sugar, two tablespoonfuls
salt, one pint boiled cider.  This may be canned like fruit.  When
ready to bake pies, add a glass of grape jelly, diluted with water, a
little butter, a few raisins, and sugar if needed.

SUMMER MINCE MEAT.  MRS. G. A. LIVINGSTON.

Two teacups of sugar, one teacup of molasses, two teacups of hot
water, one teacup of chopped raisins, one-half cup of butter, one-half
cup of vinegar, two eggs, six rolled crackers or bread crumbs;
cinnamon, allspice, cloves, and nutmeg to taste.

MINCE MEAT.  MRS. B. TRISTRAM.

Three and a half pint bowls of chopped meat, two and a half bowls of
suet, four bowls of apples, three bowls of raisins (half of them
chopped), two bowls of currants, half a pound of citron (chopped very
fine), seven teaspoons even full of salt, four teaspoons cloves, six
teaspoons cinnamon, five teaspoons of mace, three nutmegs, four bowls
of granulated sugar; mix with sweet cider.

PUMPKIN PIE.  MRS. C. C. STOLTZ.

Two tablespoonfuls of cooked pumpkin, one egg, one-half cup of sugar,
one-half pint of milk, cinnamon and nutmeg to taste, and a pinch of
salt.  This is enough for one pie.

PUMPKIN PIE.  MRS. T. H. LINSLEY

One coffeecup of mashed pumpkin, reduced to the proper consistency
with rich milk and melted butter or cream, one tablespoonful of flour
a small pinch of salt, one teaspoon of ginger, one teaspoon of
cinnamon, one half nutmeg, one half teaspoon of vanilla, one half
teaspoon of lemon extract, two-thirds cup of sugar.

PUFF PASTE.–One third cup of lard, a little salt, mix slightly with
one and one half cups of flour, moisten with very cold water, just
enough to hold together; get into shape for your tin as soon as
possible.  Brush the paste with the white of egg.  Bake in a hot oven
until a rich brown.

BLUE STOCKING PUMPKIN PIE.  MRS. U. F. SEFFNER.

Steam Hubbard Squash, or good sweet pumpkin, until soft, and put
through a colander.  Put one-half cup of butter into an iron frying
pan over the fire.  When it begins to brown, add one quart of strained
pumpkin; let it cook a few moments, stirring all the time; put into a
large bowl or crock; add two quarts of good rich milk, eight eggs,
beaten separately, two large cups of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt,
one of pepper, one of ginger, one of cinnamon, one of cloves, one
grated nutmeg, and one tablespoonful of vanilla.  Bake in moderate
oven, with under crust only.  Brush the crust with white of egg before
filling.  This will make five pies.

PUMPKIN PIES.  MRS. E. FAIRFIELD.

One quart of pumpkin, one cup of Orleans molasses, one cup of brown
sugar, one pint of milk, three eggs, one tablespoon each of nutmeg,
ginger, and cinnamon, and one teaspoon of salt.  This will make two
large, or three small pies.

LEMON PIE.  MRS. P. O. SHARPLESS.

One lemon; grate the yellow rind and squeeze the juice.  One scant cup
sugar, two tablespoons of flour (rounded full), the yolks of two eggs,
beat until light; then add one and a half cups of boiling water, in
which has been melted a heaping tablespoonful of butter; lastly, add
three drops of vanilla extract.  When baked, cover with the whites of
two eggs, beaten to a stiff froth with four tablespoonfuls of sugar.
Return to the oven until it is a very delicate brown.  This makes two
small pies, or one large one.

FIG TARTS.  MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

Make a puff paste; roll about twice the thickness you would for pie.
Bake in forms cut with the lid of a pound baking powder can; score in
eight parts about one-half inch deep; turn every other one to the
center; pinch them together to hold the filling.

FIG FILLING FOR TARTS.–One-half pound figs; soak, and cut out the
stems; mince very fine.  To each cup of minced figs, put one cup of
sugar, and one-half cup of water; boil until it jells.  Fill the
shells, and put on top a soft frosting.

LEMON TARTS.  MRS. SUSIE SEFFNER.

One cup of white sugar, one grated lemon, whites of three eggs beaten
to a froth, and butter the size of a walnut.  Put on stove; let come
to a boiling heat, but not boil.  Stir in whites of eggs the last
thing, and put in tart shells.

PUMPKIN PIE.  MRS. R. H. JOHNSON.

One-half pint of stewed pumpkin, one pint of hot milk, one cup of
brown sugar, one egg, one large tablespoonful of flour, one-half large
tablespoonful of butter, one-half teaspoonful of ginger, one-half
teaspoonful of vanilla.

PLUM PIE.  MRS. JULIA P. ECKHART.

Line a pan with puff paste; put in a layer of Damson plums; sprinkle
with cinnamon and sugar.  Put in the oven, and let it bake until the
crust is done; take from the oven; put on top a batter made from three
eggs, one cup of sugar, three tablespoons of cold water, one cup of
flour, one teaspoon of baking powder.  This is sufficient batter to
cover three pies.  Serve warm.

MOLASSES PIE.  MRS. L. M. DENISON.

One cup of sugar, one cup of molasses, one cup of cold water, one-half
cup of butter or lard, four cups of flour, one tablespoonful of
cinnamon, and one teaspoonful of soda.  Bake in crust as you would
custard pie.

RAISIN PIE.  MRS. J. M. DAVIDSON.

One teacupful of raisins (seeded and chopped), one cup of sugar, the
juice of one good-sized lemon, one cup of boiling water; set this on
stove; let come to a boil; then add four heaping teaspoonfuls of
flour, wet in a little cold water; after it boils again, put in a
small piece of butter and a little grated nutmeg; let cool before
making into pies.  This makes one very large pie.  By doubling the
amount, you can make three good-sized pies.  The filling will keep for
some time.