Recipes for Salads and Salad Dressings

SALADS AND SALAD DRESSING.

“To make a perfect salad, there should be a spendthrift for oil, a
miser for vinegar, a wise man for salt, and a madcap to stir the
ingredients up, and mix them well together.”
                                                    — SPANISH PROVERB

It is said that “Any fool can make a salad,” but all salads are not
made by fools.  “Mixing” comes by intuition, and the successful cooks
use the ingredients, judgment, and their own tastes, rather than the
recipe.

Any number of salads and fillings for sandwiches for home use, teas or
receptions, can be made at little cost and trouble, by using the
following simple recipe for dressing.  The secret of success of the
dressing lies in the mixing of the ingredients:

Powder the cold yolks of four hard boiled eggs; then stir in one
tablespoon even full of common mustard, one-half teaspoonful of salt,
and two heaping tablespoonfuls of pulverized sugar.  When mixed
thoroughly, add three tablespoonfuls of good table oil, and stir
rapidly for three minutes; then add six tablespoonfuls of good, sharp
vinegar, and stir for five minutes.  Now you will have dressing
sufficient for a dozen or fifteen plates of salad, and one that will
keep in a cool place for weeks.

LETTUCE SALAD.

Add to the above dressing just before serving, one pound of crisp
lettuce, cut in one-half inch squares, or sliced fine.  Garnish the
dish or dishes with the white of the egg, chopped fine, to which add
the thin slices of two or three small radishes.

LOBSTER SALAD.

Take one pound of fresh or canned lobster, two small onions, one
fourth of a lemon (with rind), two bunches of celery, or a like amount
of crisp cabbage; chop fine, and thoroughly mix with the dressing.
Serve on a lettuce leaf in individual dishes; garnish with the white
of the eggs, chopped fine.

Veal, chicken, terrapin, salmon, little-neck clams, scollops, etc.,
can be utilized by the judicious cook in connection with the dressing.

SANDWICH FILLING.

Take ham, veal, chicken, sardines, etc., with the white of the eggs,
chopped exceedingly fine, and mixed with sufficient of the dressing to
make a paste the consistency of butter; spread this on thin slices of
bread, cut in irregular shapes, and you have most delicious
sandwiches.

Dedicated to the Committee, by
Yours respectfully,
H. M. STOWE.

CHICKEN SALAD.  MRS. JOHN LANDON.

Take white and choice dark meat of a cold boiled chicken or turkey,
three-quarters same bulk of chopped celery or cabbage, and a few
cucumber pickles, chopped well and mixed together.  For the dressing
take the yolks of two hard boiled eggs, rub to a fine powder; mix with
it a teaspoonful of salt, teaspoonful pepper, teaspoonful mustard, two
teaspoonfuls white sugar; then add three teaspoonfuls salad oil, and,
last of all, one-half cup vinegar.   Pour the dressing over the
chopped meat, cabbage, etc., and stir all well together.

CHICKEN SALAD.  MRS. A. A. LUCAS.

Take two large chickens; boil tender; pick in small bits.  Chop as
much celery as you have meat.  For the dressing, take six yolks and
one whole egg; beat to a froth, mix with two spoonfuls of salad oil,
one spoonful mixed mustard, a little pepper and salt, one pint
vinegar, heated; before it boils, stir in the other ingredients; cook
till thick, stirring all the time.  Boil down the liquid in which the
chickens were cooked until it forms a jelly.  Let all cool.  Two or
three hours before using, mix meat, celery, liquid, and dressing.

CHICKEN SALAD.  MRS. G. H. WRIGHT.

Two chickens, boiled tender and minced fine, five hard boiled eggs,
and one raw egg.  Take as much chopped cabbage as you have minced
chicken; chop the whites of the boiled eggs, and put with the chicken.
Mix the cooked yolks with the raw egg; add one teacup of the broth and
oil from the chicken; one pint of good vinegar, salt, pepper, mustard,
and season to taste.  Part celery and part cabbage can be used, if
desired.  Mix all together.

CHICKEN SALAD FOR TWO HUNDRED.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Thirty chickens, cooked and cut medium fine, fifty heads of celery,
two gallons of good strong vinegar, three pounds of light brown sugar,
ten cents worth of yellow mustard, three pounds of butter, four dozen
eggs, boiled hard.  Chop whites, and cream yolks with butter.  Boil
vinegar and sugar together, and skim; add the creamed butter and
yolks; also, mustard, salt and pepper to taste; let stand until cold;
then pour over the celery and chicken; mix thoroughly, and add the
whites of eggs.  If unable to get celery, use crisp cabbage, with ten
cents worth of celery seed.  If you use celery seed, boil it in the
vinegar.

CHICKEN SALAD.  MRS. T. H. B. BEALE.

Shred cold boiled chicken, and measure one pint chicken and one pint
celery; season with French dressing as below, and keep on ice until
ready to serve.

FRENCH DRESSING.–One saltspoon of salt, one-half saltspoon of white
pepper, one-fourth teaspoon of onion juice, one tablespoon of vinegar,
three tablespoons of olive oil, or melted butter; mix in the order
given, adding the oil slowly. When ready to serve your salad, mix it
with the boiled dressing given below; arrange it, and garnish with
parsley.

BOILED DRESSING.–Mix one teaspoon of mustard, two teaspoons of salt,
two tablespoons of sugar, one-fourth saltspoon of cayenne pepper, one
heaping teaspoon of flour; mix well; then add one egg, well beaten;
and one cup hot water.  Put in double boiler, and boil ten minutes.
While it is cooking, add one-half cup hot vinegar.  When done, add one
tablespoon of melted butter, or Lucca oil, if prepared.  After it is
cooked, turn into a bowl; put on ice until cold; add to salad just
before serving. If you like filberts in the salad, pour boiling water
on them; let them stand a short time, then throw them into cold water;
remove the skins, break into halves; put into salad before you pour on
the boiled dressing.

For a company of seventy-five, use six chickens, and six times both
recipes for dressing, and three pounds of filberts.

BEAN SALAD.  MRS. W. E. THOMAS.

Cold cooked stringed beans, drained and dressed with a simple oil and
vinegar dressing, or mayonnaise, make an excellent salad.

TOMATO SALAD IN WINTER.  MRS. DR. FISHER.

Take the juice from a can of tomatoes, and with gelatine make it into
a jelly that will mold.  Lay a slice of this jelly on lettuce leaves,
and serve with mayonnaise.

CUCUMBER SALAD.  MRS. ELIZA DICKERSON.

Two dozen large cucumbers, six white onions, chopped fine; salt well,
and drain twelve hours; add white mustard seed and celery seed; cover
with strong vinegar.

POTATO SALAD.  MISS ANN THOMPSON.

The yolks of five eggs, five tablespoonfuls vinegar; cook until thick;
then, just before using, add three tablespoonfuls melted butter; beat
to a cream.  Put in pepper, salt, and mustard to taste, one onion
(chopped fine), and three-fourths cup of cream.  Slice potatoes thin,
and pour dressing over.

GERMAN POTATO SALAD.  MRS. BELINDA MARTIN.

After frying ham, put one-fourth cup of the hot fryings into a skillet
with one cup of good vinegar, one tablespoon of sugar; let boil a
moment.  Slice hot boiled potatoes into your salad bowl; season with
pepper and salt, and one onion, chopped fine.  Pour over this the hot
vinegar, and mix well.  Garnish with hard boiled eggs.  Early in the
spring young dandelions added to this are very nice.

POTATO SALAD.  MRS. DELL W. DE WOLFE.

One gallon cold and thinly sliced good potatoes, six small onions,
sliced thin.  Sprinkle very freely with salt and pepper.

DRESSING.–Yolks of nine fresh eggs, two teaspoonfuls of ground
mustard, a pinch of cayenne pepper, one cup of sugar, one cup of good
cider vinegar, one-half cup butter.  Boil the above mixture, and add
one pint of thick sweet cream when the mixture is almost cold.  Two
small cucumbers sliced will greatly improve this salad.

CABBAGE SALAD.  MRS. G. H. WRIGHT.

One small head of cabbage (cut fine), one pint of good vinegar, butter
the size of an egg, three eggs, well beaten with one tablespoon of
flour; salt and pepper to taste.  Let dressing come to a boil, and
pour over cabbage while hot.

POTATO SALAD DRESSING.  MRS. E. A. SEFFNER.

Add the well beaten yolks of five eggs to five tablespoonfuls of
boiling vinegar; cook until it thickens, stirring constantly.  Remove
from the fire.  Add two tablespoonfuls butter, and stir until cool.
Season with one teaspoon mustard, one of salt, one tablespoon of
sugar, pinch of cayenne pepper, one cup of cream.  Use oil in place of
butter, if preferred.

SALAD DRESSING.  MRS. CHAS. MOORE.

Beat three eggs, and add a teaspoon each of salt, pepper, and mustard;
six tablespoons of cream or milk, small half teacup of vinegar, and
one-half cup sugar; mix thoroughly and set in top of teakettle,
stirring constantly till it thickens.

WEYMOUTH SALAD DRESSING.  MRS. VOSE.

Yolk of one egg, one tablespoon sugar, one saltspoon salt, one
teaspoon mustard, butter size of small egg, one-half cup of vinegar;
cook till thick as cream.  Add one-half cup of thick cream before
using.

MAYONNAISE DRESSING.  MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

Take the yolks of six eggs, one teacup best cider vinegar, one teacup
white sugar, one tablespoon pure mustard, one-fourth pound of butter,
one teaspoon salt, one pint water, two tablespoons corn starch.  Put
the water and vinegar in granite iron vessel, and let come to a boil.
Beat the rest of the ingredients to a cream; stir this into the
vinegar rapidly to prevent burning.  Put in self-sealing can, and keep
in a cool place.