Recipes for Soups

The best soups are made with a blending of many flavors.  Don’t be
afraid of experimenting with them.  Where you make one mistake you
will be surprised to find the number of successful varieties you can
produce.  If you like a spicy flavor, try two or three cloves, or
allspice, or bay leaves.  All soups are improved by a dash of onion,
unless it is the white soups, or purees from chicken, veal, fish, etc.
In these celery may be used.

In nothing so well as soups can a housekeeper be economical of the
odds and ends of food left from meals.  One of the best cooks was in
the habit of saving everything, and announced one day, when her soup
was especially praised, that it contained the crumbs of gingerbread
from her cake box!

Creamed onions left from a dinner, or a little stewed corn or
tomatoes, potatoes fried or mashed, a few baked beans–even a small
dish of apple sauce–have often added to the flavor of soup.  Of
course, all good meat gravies, or bones from roast or fried meats, can
be added to the contents of your stock kettle.  A little butter is
always needed in tomato soup.

Stock is regularly prepared by taking fresh meat (cracking the bones
and cutting the meat into small pieces) and covering it with cold
water.  Put it over the fire and simmer or boil gently until the meat
is very tender.  Some cooks say, allow an hour for each pound of meat.
Be sure to skim carefully.  When done take out meat and strain your
liquid.  It will frequently jelly, and will keep in a cold place for
several days, and is useful for gravies, as well as soups.

A FINE SOUP.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Take good soup stock and strain it.  When it boils add cracker balls,
made thus:  To one pint of cracker crumbs add a pinch of salt and
pepper, one teaspoonful parsley, cut fine, one teaspoonful baking
powder, mixed with the crumbs, one small dessert spoon of butter, one
egg; stir all together; make into balls size of a marble; place on
platter to dry for about two hours; when ready to serve your soup put
them into the stock; boil five minutes.

ROAST BEEF SOUP.  MRS. W. C. BUTCHER

To a good loin roast add six tablespoons of vinegar and small piece of
butter; salt and pepper; stick six cloves in the roast; sprinkle two
tablespoons of cinnamon and sift one cup of flour over it.  Put in
oven in deep pan or kettle with a quart of boiling water; roast until
it is about half done and then strain over it three-fourths of a can
of tomatoes; finish roasting it and when done add celery-salt to suit
the taste, and one cup of sweet cream and some catsup, if preferred.

BEAN SOUP.  MRS. H. F. SNYDER.

To one quart of beans add one teaspoon of soda, cover with water, let
boil until the hulls will slip off, skim the beans out, throw them
into cold water, rub with the hands, then remove the hulls; drain, and
rub until all hulls are removed; take two quarts of water to one quart
of beans, boil until the beans will mash smooth; boil a small piece of
meat with the beans.  If you have no meat, rub butter and flour
together, add to the soup, pour over toasted bread or crackers, and
season with salt and pepper.  Add a little parsley, if desired.

BOUILLON.  MRS. W. C. DENMAN.

Take three pounds of lean beef (cut into small pieces) and one soup
bone; cover with three quarts of cold water, and heat slowly.  Add one
tablespoon of salt, six pepper corns, six cloves, one tablespoon mixed
herbs, one or two onions, and boil slowly five hours.  Strain, and
when cold, remove the fat.  Heat again before serving, and season with
pepper, salt, and Worcester sauce, according to taste.

LEMON BOUILLON.  LOUISE KRAUSE.

A DELICATE SOUP.–Take soup meat, put on to cook in cold water; boil
until very tender; season with salt.  Into each soup plate slice very
fine one hard boiled egg and two or three very thin slices of lemon.
Strain the meat broth over this and serve hot, with crackers.

CORN SOUP.  MRS. G. H. WRIGHT.

Cover a soup bone with water, and boil one hour.  Add some cabbage and
onion (cut fine).  Boil two hours longer.  Add twelve ears of grated
sweet corn.  Season to taste.

NOODLE SOUP.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Beat three eggs.  Add a pinch of salt, and flour sufficient for a
stiff dough; roll into very thin sheets; dredge with flour to avoid
sticking; turn often until dry enough to cut; cut very fine, and add
to the stock five minutes before serving.  Season to taste.

OYSTER STEW.  MRS. J. ED. THOMAS.

Wash one quart oysters and place on the fire.  When they boil, add one
quart of boiling milk, and season with salt, pepper, and plenty of
butter.  Serve with crackers or toast.

POTATO SOUP.  MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

Slice four ordinary-sized potatoes into one quart of boiling water.
When done add one quart milk; into this slice one onion.  Thicken just
before serving with one egg rubbed into as much flour as it will
moisten.  Pepper and salt to taste.

POTATO SOUP.  MRS. U. F. SEFFNER.

After stewing veal, use the stock.  Slice four or five potatoes very
thin; lay them in cold water until thirty minutes before serving; add
them to the stock, with sufficient salt and pepper.  Beat one
tablespoon of butter and one tablespoon of flour to cream; add to this
one pint milk; stir in the soup just before serving.  This can be made
without meat by adding more butter and milk.

TOMATO SOUP.  MRS. R. H. JOHNSON.

Take half a can, or six large fresh tomatoes; stew until you can pass
through a course sieve.  Rub one tablespoonful of butter to a cream
with one tablespoonful flour or corn starch.  Have ready a pint
scalded milk, into which stir one-half saltspoon soda.  Put the
strained tomato into the soup pot; add the butter and flour, after
having heated them to almost frying point; let come to a good boil;
add just before serving; season with a little pepper, a lump of loaf
sugar, a dust of mace and a teaspoon of salt.

TOMATO SOUP.  MRS. HARRY TRUE.

One quart canned tomatoes, one quart of water, a few stalks of celery;
boil until soft.  Return to stove, and add three-fourths of a teaspoon
of soda and allow to effervesce; then add the liquid from one quart of
oysters, one quart boiling milk and one cup of cream.  Salt, butter,
and pepper to taste.  Boil a few moments and serve.

TOMATO SOUP.  MRS. T. H. B. BEALE

Put on soup bone early to boil.  Have two quarts of liquor on the
bone.  When done, remove the bone from kettle; put one can of tomatoes
through sieve; add to the liquor; then immediately add one-half
teaspoon soda, a small lump butter, one tablespoon white sugar, one
heaping tablespoon of flour mixed with a half cup of cream or milk;
salt and pepper to taste.  After the flour is in let boil up three
times, and serve.

VEGETABLE SOUP.  MRS. J. S. REED.

One-fourth head cabbage, three large onions, one turnip, three large
potatoes, two tablespoons cooked beans; boil all together till tender.
Pour off all water; then add one gallon of stock.  Add tomatoes, if
you like.

VEAL SOUP.  MRS. SAMUEL BARTRAM.

Put a veal soup bone over the fire in one gallon of cold water; skim
carefully as it comes to a boil; after it has boiled one hour season
it with salt and pepper and half teaspoonful (scant) celery seed.  In
another half hour put in one-half cup rice, one medium-sized potato
(cut in dice or thin slices), two good-sized onions (sliced fine); let
boil one-half hour longer, and when ready to serve add one egg
(well-beaten), one-half cup milk, one tablespoon flour; let come to a
boil, and serve.

VEGETABLE SOUP.  MRS. G. A. LIVINGSTON.

Three onions, three carrots, three turnips, one small cabbage, one
pint tomatoes.  Chop all the vegetables, except the tomatoes, very
fine.  Have ready in a porcelain kettle three quarts boiling water;
put in all except tomatoes and cabbage; simmer for one-half hour; then
add the chopped cabbage and tomatoes (the tomatoes previously stewed);
also a bunch of sweet herbs.  Let soup boil for twenty minutes; strain
through a sieve, rubbing all the vegetables through.  Take two
tablespoonfuls butter, one tablespoon flour; beat to cream.  Pepper
and salt to taste, and add a teaspoon of white sugar; one-half cup
sweet cream, if you have it; stir in butter and flour; let it boil up,
and it is ready for the table.  Serve with fried bread chips or
poached eggs, one in each dish.