Recipes for Vegetables

VEGETABLES.

“Cheerful cooks make every dish a feast.”
                                                          –MASSINGER.

Always have the water boiling when you put your vegetables in, and
keep it constantly boiling until they are done.  Cook each kind by
itself when convenient.  All vegetables should be well seasoned.

BEETS.

Boil the beets in salted water until tender.  When cold, skin; cut in
thin slices, and dress with white pepper, salt, oil, or butter, and
vinegar; or pour over them a French dressing, and toss with a silver
fork until every piece is coated with the dressing.

STRING BEANS, WITH ACID DRESSING.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Cook wax beans in salted water with a little salt pork.  When the
beans are tender, take out and drain.  Let a few bits of breakfast
bacon brown in a skillet, then put in a half pint of good vinegar and
a spoonful of sugar (omit the sugar if you prefer the pure acid); let
boil; add an onion, sliced fine; pour over the beans, and mix well
before serving.

BAKED BEANS.  MRS. S. A. POWERS.

Pick over and wash well one quart of small white beans; soak over
night.  In the morning, pour off the water and cover with cold water.
After boiling one-half hour, drain them, and cover again with cold
water.  Boil until cooked, but not broken.  Put them in a baking dish.
In the center place one pound salt pork (which has been parboiled and
well gashed), one tablespoonful of molasses, one dash of cayenne
pepper, black pepper to taste, and, if necessary, a little salt.
Ordinarily the pork should salt the beans.  Cover with part of the
liquor in which the pork has been parboiled, and bake three hours.

COLD SLAW, WITH ONION.  MRS. E.

Slice cabbage fine on a slaw cutter.  To a dish of cabbage use one
large onion, also sliced fine.  Mix with good vinegar; salt, pepper
and sugar to taste.

CABBAGE.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

HOW TO BOIL.–Cut a large head of cabbage into quarters; then re-cut
the quarters, and wash well in cold water; pour boiling water over it,
and cover about five minutes; drain in colander, and add one
good-sized onion, a pinch of cayenne pepper, and enough meat broth to
cover it; boil until tender.  A brisket of beef is best for the broth.

CABBAGE.  MISS BERTHA MARTIN.

SCALLOPED.–Roll crackers as for oysters.  Cut cabbage as for slaw.
Put in your pan a layer of crackers, then a layer of cabbage, With
salt, pepper, and lumps of butter, until the pan is filled; cover with
sweet milk.  Bake thirty or forty minutes.

GREEN CORN PATTIES.  MRS. G. H. WRIGHT.

Take twelve ears of green corn (grated), one teaspoon of salt, and one
teaspoon of pepper; beat one egg into this, with two tablespoons of
flour.  Drop into hot butter or lard.

CORN OYSTERS.  MRS. G. H. WRIGHT.

To one quart of grated corn add three eggs, beaten separately; four
crackers, rolled fine; salt and pepper to taste. Fry in butter or
lard.

CORN OYSTERS.  MRS. J. C. WALTERS.

Grate and chop one pint of young sweet corn; add one egg, well beaten;
one teacupful flour, three tablespoonfuls cream, one teaspoonful salt.
Fry like oysters.

POTATOES “AU GRATIN.”  JENNY E. WALLACE.

Take one tablespoonful of butter, and three tablespoonfuls of flour;
mix together on stove, and add two cups milk.  Chop fine cold boiled
potatoes; put in a baking dish; pour the dressing over, and add enough
grated cheese to cover it; bake about thirty minutes.

POTATO CROQUETTES.  MRS. F. W. THOMAS.

Take one pint of mashed potatoes; season with one tablespoonful of
soft butter, one-half saltspoon of white pepper, one-half teaspoon of
salt, one-half teaspoon of celery salt, a few drops of onion juice,
and some egg; mix well till light; rub through a strainer; return to
the fire and stir till the potato cleaves the dish.  When cool, shape
into balls, then into cylinders; roil in fine bread or cracker crumbs;
dip in beaten egg, then in crumbs again, and fry brown in hot fat.

WHIPPED POTATOES.  MRS. B. B. CLARK.

Instead of mashing in the ordinary way, whip potatoes with a fork
until light and dry; then put in a little melted butter, some milk,
and salt to taste, whipping rapidly until creamy.  Put as lightly and
irregularly as you can in a hot dish.

LYONNAISE POTATOES.

For lyonnaise potatoes chop an onion fine; fry it brown in a
tablespoonful of butter; add another tablespoonful to the iron spider
after the frying, and let the butter become very hot.  Then cut six
whole boiled potatoes into thick or half inch slices, and lay them in
the spider, which should be ample enough to hold them without lapping
over another.  Let them fry brown on both sides, tossing them
occasionally to prevent them burning.  Sprinkle a tablespoonful of
parsley over them, and serve at once.  They should be very hot when
brought on the table.

ESCALOPED POTATOES.  MRS. O. W. WEEKS.

Pare and slice thin the potatoes; put a layer in your pudding pan
one-half inch deep; sprinkle salt, pepper, and bits of butter over it;
then put another layer of potatoes, and another sprinkle of salt,
pepper, and butter, until you have as many layers as you wish.  Fill
in with sweet cream or milk until you can just begin to see it.
Sprinkle on top one cracker, pulverized.  Bake in hot oven from
one-half to one hour.

MASHED SWEET POTATOES.  MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Pare and boil till done; drain, and mash smooth; add milk or cream,
and salt; beat like cake, with a large spoon–the more they are beaten
the better they become.  Put in a baking dish; smooth with a knife
dipped in milk; place a lump of butter in the center; sprinkle with
pepper, and place in a hot oven for a few minutes.

BROWNED SWEET POTATOES.  MRS. ECKHART.

Pare, and cut in halves.  Have in a skillet some hot fryings, in which
place potatoes; pour in about one-half pint of water; season with salt
and pepper.  Cook until tender.  Remove the cover, and let brown; take
out in dish; throw a spoonful of sugar into skillet, with a little
flour and water; let boil up once or twice, and pour over the
potatoes.

SWEET POTATOES, SOUTHERN FASHION.  MRS. W. E. THOMAS.

Boil your potatoes until soft; slice them, and lay in a buttered
pudding dish.  Sprinkle each layer with light brown sugar; and dot
thickly with bits of butter.  Over all pour enough water to cover well
the bottom of your dish.  Set in oven and bake half an hour or more,
thoroughly browning the top, and cooking the sugar, butter and water
into a rich syrup.  Some add, also, a dash of flour between the
layers.  Serve hot with your meat and other vegetables.

DRIED PUMPKIN.  MRS. J. EDD THOMAS.

Stew pumpkin as for pie; spread upon plates, and dry in the oven
carefully.  When you wish to make pie, soak over night; then proceed
as you would with fresh pumpkin.  Pumpkin prepared in this way will
keep well until spring, and pies are as good as when made with fresh
pumpkin.

STEWED RICE.  MRS. EDWARD E. POWERS.

Take one-half cup of rice; wash it twice; cover with water two inches
above rice; cook dry; then cover with a cup or more of milk; add
butter the size of a walnut, and salt to taste.  When cooked dry
again, serve hot with cream and sugar.

NEW ENGLAND SUCCOTASH.  MRS. S. A. POWERS.

Take two quarts shelled Lima beans (green), one dozen ears of corn
(cut off cob), and one pound pickled pork.  Cover pork with water, and
parboil it; add beans cooked until they burst; then add corn, two
tablespoonfuls sugar, butter the size of a walnut, and pepper to
taste.  After corn is added, watch carefully to keep from scorching.

TURNIPS.  M. E. WRIGHT.

Put one-half teacup of butter in your kettle, and let it get hot; then
add one tablespoon sugar.  Have your turnips sliced fine; put them in
your kettle and stir well; add enough water to stew tender; then
sprinkle over them one tablespoon of flour and a little rich cream.
Stir well, and serve.  Sweet potatoes are excellent cooked the same
way.

TO STEW TURNIP.  MRS. ECKHART.

Pare, halve, and slice them on a slaw cutter; boil in clear water.
When tender, add a large lump of butter, a teaspoonful of sugar, and
pepper and salt to taste.  Stir in flour and cream to thicken like
peas.  Serve in sauce dishes.

TOMATO MACARONI.  EXCHANGE.

Break macaroni in pieces three inches long and boil until tender.
Butter a deep dish, and place a layer of pared and sliced tomatoes on
the bottom (if canned, use them just as they come from the can); add a
layer of the stewed macaroni, and season with salt, pepper, and bits
of butter; add another layer of tomato, and so on until the dish is as
full as desired.  Place a layer of cracker crumbs on top, with bits of
butter.  Bake about thirty minutes, or until well browned.

EGGS.

Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall.
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.
All the kings horses and all the kings men
Could not set Humpty Dumpty back again.
                                                       –MOTHER GOOSE.

Try the freshness of eggs by putting them into cold water; those that
sink the soonest are the freshest.

Never attempt to boil an egg without watching the timepiece.  Put the
eggs in boiling water.  In three minutes eggs will boil soft; in four
minutes the white part will be cooked; in ten minutes they will be
hard enough for salad.

HOW TO PRESERVE.  MRS. M. UHLER.

To each pailful of water add two pints of fresh slaked lime and one
pint of common salt; mix well.  Fill your barrel half full with this
fluid, put your eggs down in it any time after June, and they will
keep two years if desired.

SOFT BOILED EGGS.  MRS. W. E. THOMAS.

Put eggs in a bowl or pan; pour boiling water over them until they are
well covered; let stand ten minutes; pour off water, and again cover
with boiling water.  If you like them quite soft, eat immediately
after pouring on second water; if you like them harder, leave them in
longer.  This method makes the white more jelly-like and digestible.

FRENCH OMELETTE.  GERTRUDE DOUGLAS WEEKS.

Take eight eggs, well beaten separately; add to the yolks eight
tablespoonfuls of sweet milk, one tablespoonful of flour, one
teaspoonful of good baking powder, salt and pepper; beat well
together, and then stir in lightly at the last the beaten whites.
Have ready a skillet with melted butter, smoking hot, and pour in
mixture.  Let cook on bottom; then put in oven from five to ten
minutes.  Serve at once.

OMELETTE.  MRS. H. T. VAN FLEET.

To the well beaten yolks of five eggs add two teaspoonfuls of corn
starch, and a little salt dissolved in one-half cup of milk.  Beat
whites to a stiff froth, and stir lightly into mixture.  Have ready a
hot buttered spider, into which turn the whole, and bake to a light
brown in a quick oven.

PLAIN OMELETTE.  MRS. C. H. WILLIAMS.

Stir into the well beaten yolks of four eggs one-half tablespoonful of
melted butter, a little salt, one tablespoonful of flour mixed smooth
in one cup of milk; beat together well, and then stir in lightly the
whites, beaten stiff; pour into buttered skillet; cook on top stove
for ten minutes, and then place in oven to brown.

EGG FOR AN INVALID.

Put two tablespoonfuls of boiling water in a sauce pan on the stove;
break a fresh egg into it; stir briskly until the egg is slightly set,
but not at all stiff; season with salt, and a little pepper.  Serve at
once on a thin slice of buttered toast.

SARDELLED EGGS.  JENNIE MARTIN HERSHBERGER, TIFFIN, OHIO.

Boil some eggs hard; remote shells, and cut the eggs oblong; take out
yolks, and cream, or mash fine.  Then take sardells, and remove the
backbone; mash fine, and mix with the yolks of eggs and a little red
pepper, and fill the whites of eggs with the mixture.  They are fine
for an appetizer.  Sardells are a small fish from three to four inches
long, and come in small kegs, like mackerel.

STUFFED EGGS.

Boil eggs for twenty minutes; then drop in cold water.  Remove the
shells, and cut lengthwise.  Remove the yolks, and cream them with a
good salad dressing.  Mix with chopped ham, or chicken, or any cold
meat, if you choose.  Make mixture into balls, and fill in the hollows
of your whites.  If you have not the salad dressing mix the yolks from
six eggs with a teaspoonful of melted butter, a dash of cayenne
pepper, a little prepared mustard, salt, vinegar and sugar to taste.