Recipes with Meats

MEATS.

“What say you to a piece of beef and mustard?”
                                                        –SHAKESPEARE.

ACCOMPANIMENTS.  MRS. DELL DE WOLFE.

With roast beef, tomato sauce, grated horseradish, mustard, cranberry
sauce, pickles.

With roast pork, apple sauce and cranberry sauce.

With roast veal, tomato sauce, mushroom sauce, onion sauce, or lemon
sauce.

With roast mutton, currant jelly, caper sauce, bread sauce, onion
sauce.

With roast lamb, mint sauce, green peas.

TO BOIL MEATS.

For all meats allow from fifteen to twenty minutes for each pound.
Skim well.  All fresh meats are to be put into boiling water to cook;
salt meats into cold water.  Keep the water constantly boiling,
otherwise the meat will absorb the water.  Be sure to add boiling
water if more is needed.  The more gently meat boils the more tender
it will be.

TO BROIL MEATS.

In broiling all meats, you must remember that the surface should not
be cut or broken any more than is absolutely necessary; that the meat
should be exposed to a clear, quick fire, close enough to sear the
surface without burning, in order to confine all its juices; if it is
approached slowly to a poor fire, or seasoned before it is cooked, it
will be comparatively dry and tasteless, as both of these processes
are useful only to extract and waste those precious juices which
contain nearly all the nourishing properties of the meat.

BEEFSTEAK.  MR. GEORGE B. CHRISTIAN.

The chief secret in preparing the family steak lies in selection.
Like cooking the hare, you must first catch it.  Choose a thick cut
from the sirloin of a mature, well fatted beeve, avoiding any having
dark yellow fat.  Detach a portion of the narrow end and trim off any
adhering inner skin.  Place the steak upon a hot spider, and quickly
turn it.  Do this frequently and rapidly until it is thoroughly
seared, without burning.  It may now be cooked to any degree without
releasing the juices.  Serve upon a hot platter.  Pour over a scant
dressing of melted butter.  Season.  Whosoever partakes will never
become a vegetarian.

STUFFED BEEFSTEAK.  E. H. W.

Take a flank or round steak and pound well; sprinkle with pepper and
salt.  Make a plain dressing; spread it on the steak; roll it up; tie
closely, and put in a skillet with a little water and a lump of butter
the size of an egg; cover closely and let it boil slowly one hour;
then let it brown in skillet, basting frequently.  When done, dredge a
little flour into the gravy, and pour over the meat.

TO FRY STEAK.  MRS. H. T. VAN FLEET.

Have a nice tenderloin or porterhouse steak, one inch and half in
thickness, well hacked.  Over this sprinkle salt, pepper, and a little
flour.  Have ready a very hot spider.  Into this drop plenty of good,
sweet butter (a quarter of a pound is not too much); when thoroughly
melted, lay in the meat; turn frequently.  While cooking, make many
openings in the steak to allow the butter to pass through.  When done,
place on a hot platter and serve immediately.

BEEFSTEAK AND ONIONS.  MRS. H. T. VAN FLEET.

Have a steak well hacked; over this sprinkle pepper, salt, and a
little flour.  Into a very hot spider drop one teaspoonful of lard;
when melted, lay in steak; pour over this two tablespoons boiling
water, and cover steak with four good-sized onions, sliced very thin.
Cover quickly and cook five minutes; then turn all over together, and
cook five minutes longer.  Care should be taken that the onions do not
turn.  Take up on hot platter; place onions on top of meat, and serve
immediately.

BEEFSTEAK AND MUSHROOMS.  CALEB H. NORRIS.

Put the steak on to fry, with a little butter.  At the same time put
the mushrooms on in a different skillet, with the water from the can
and one-half cup extra; season with pepper and salt, and thicken with
a tablespoonful of flour.  Take the steak out, leaving the gravy, into
which put the mushrooms, cook for a few minutes, and pour all over the
steak.

BEEF LOAF.  MRS. J. J. SLOAN.

Take three and one-half pounds of lean beef (raw), chopped; six
crackers, rolled fine; three well-beaten eggs, four tablespoonfuls of
cream, butter the size of an egg; salt and pepper to taste; mix all
together and make into a loaf.  Bake one and one-half hours.  Serve
cold in thin slices.

BEEF A LA MODE.  ALICE TURNEY THOMPSON.

Take a round of beef, four or five inches thick, and for a piece
weighing five pounds soak a pound of white bread in cold water until
soft; turn off the water; mash the bread fine; then add a piece of
butter the size of an egg, half a teaspoonful each of salt, pepper,
and ground cloves, about half a nutmeg, two eggs, a tablespoonful of
flour, and a quarter of a pound of fresh pork, chopped very fine.
Gash the beef on both sides and fill with half the dressing.  Place in
a baking pan, with luke-warm water enough to cover it; cover the pan
and put into the oven to bake gently two hours; then cover the top
with the rest of the dressing, and put it back for another hour and
let it brown well.  On dishing up the meat, if the gravy is not thick
enough, stir in a little flour, and add a little butter.  It is a
favorite meat, eaten cold for suppers and luncheons.  When thus used,
remove the gravy.

FRIED LIVER.

Always use calf’s liver, cut in slices.  Pour boiling water over, and
let it stand fifteen minutes.  Fry some slices of breakfast bacon;
take out the bacon; roll the liver in either flour or corn meal, and
fry a delicate brown; sprinkle with salt and pepper.  Serve with gravy
if you like.

POTATO AND MEAT PIE.

Take mashed potatoes, seasoned with salt, pepper, and butter; line a
baking dish with it; lay upon this slices of cold meat (any kind),
with a little pepper, salt, catsup, and gravy; then another layer of
potatoes, another of meat, and so forth till pan is filled, having the
last a cover of potatoes.  Bake until thoroughly warmed.  Serve in the
dish in which it is cooked.

COLD MEAT TURNOVERS.  MRS. A. B.

Roll out dough very thin; put in it, like a turnover, cold meat,
chopped fine, and seasoned with pepper, salt, catsup, and sweet herbs.
Make into small turnovers, and fry in lard until the dough is well
cooked.

VEAL CUTLETS.  MRS. U. F. SEFFNER.

Fry a few slices of breakfast bacon.  Dip the cutlets in a beaten egg;
roll in corn meal or cracker crumbs; salt and pepper; put in skillet
with the fat from bacon; fry slowly until a nice brown.

VEAL LOAF.  MRS. GERTRUDE DOUGLAS WEEKS.

Three pounds of veal or beef, chopped fine; three eggs, beaten with
three tablespoons of milk, butter the size of an egg, one cup of
powdered crackers, one teaspoon of black pepper; one tablespoon of
salt; mix well together; form into a loaf, and bake two and one-half
hours.  Baste with butter and water while baking.

VEAL STEW.

Cut four pounds of veal into strips three or four inches long and
about one inch thick.  Peel twelve large potatoes; cut them into
slices one inch thick.  Put a layer of veal in the bottom of the
kettle, and sprinkle salt and a very little pepper over it; then put a
layer of potatoes; then a layer of veal, seasoned as before, and so on
until all the veal is used. Over the last layer of veal put a layer of
salt pork, cut in slices; cover with potatoes; pour in water until it
rises an inch over the whole; cover close; heat fifteen minutes;
simmer one hour.

DRESSING FOR ROAST OF VEAL.  MRS. E. FAIRFIELD.

Two cups of stale bread crumbs, one tablespoonful melted butter;
pepper and salt to taste; make into a soft paste with cream, and lay
over top of roast to brown for about one-half hour before roast is
done.

VEAL AND HAM SANDWICH.  MARY W. WHITMARSH.

Boil six pounds each of ham and veal.  Save the water from boiling the
veal, and to it add half a box of gelatine, dissolved in a little cold
water.  When the meat is cold, run through a sausage grinder, and with
the meats mix the gelatinous water.  Season the veal with salt,
pepper, and sweet marjoram.  Put a little red pepper in the ham.  Make
alternate layers of ham and veal, using a potato masher to pound it
down smooth.  Set in cold place.  It is better to make it the day
before using.

POT ROAST.  MRS. BELINDA MARTIN.

Use any kind of meat; put into an iron pot a tablespoonful of meat
fryings or butter; let it brown; wash off the roast, and put into the
pot.  After it begins to fry, pour in enough water to half cover the
meat; season with pepper and salt; cover, and stew slowly.  As the
meat begins to fry, add more water; turn it often, and cook about
three hours.  A half hour before serving, add either Irish or sweet
potatoes, or turnips; let brown with the meat.

TO ROAST PORK.

Take a leg of pork, and wash clean; cut the skin in squares.  Make a
dressing of bread crumbs, sage, onions, pepper and salt; moisten it
with the yolk of an egg.  Put this under the skin of the knuckle, and
sprinkle a little powdered sage into the rind where it is cut.  Eight
pounds will require about three hours to roast.  Shoulder, loin, or
spare ribs may be roasted in the same manner.

SCRAPPLE.  MRS. EDWARD E. POWERS.

Two pounds pork, two pounds liver, two pounds beef, a small heart;
boil all until thoroughly cooked; take up and chop while warm; put
back into broth (altogether you will have two and one-half or three
gallons); then make quite thick with corn meal.  Cook one-half hour.
Put in pans to mold.  Season meat while cooking with salt, pepper, and
sage.

SPICED MEAT.  MRS. IRA UHLER.

Take five pounds of beef from the shoulder and cover with cold water;
boil until very tender; chop fine and season with salt and pepper.
Slice four or five hard boiled eggs.  Alternate layers of meat and
eggs, having a layer of meat on the top.  Put an ounce of gelatine and
a few cloves into the liquor in which the meat has been boiled; boil
this down to one pint; strain it over the meat, which must be pressed
down with a plate.  Set in a cool place.  Slice cold for serving.

BATTER PUDDING WITH BEEF ROAST.  MRS. C. H. NORRIS.

Put roast in oven, and cook within an hour of being done; then place a
couple of sticks across the pan and rest your roast upon them.  Make a
batter according to the following rule, and pour it right into the
gravy in which the roast has been resting, cook an hour and serve:
Four eggs, tablespoon of sugar, one quart of milk, six tablespoons of
flour, and a piece of butter the size of a walnut.

BONED SHOULDER OF MUTTON.

Have the bone carefully removed from a rather lean shoulder of mutton,
and fill the orifice thus left with a good forcemeat.  To make this,
chop fine half a pound of lean veal and quarter of a pound of ham and
add to these a small cup of fine bread crumbs.  Season with a
quarter-teaspoonful each of ground mace, cloves, and allspice, and a
saltspoonful of black pepper.  Stir in a raw egg to bind the mixture
together.  When the forcemeat has been put into the hole in the
shoulder, cover the mutton with a cloth that will close the mouth of
the opening, and lay the meat in a pot with the bone from the
shoulder, a peeled and sliced onion, carrot and turnip, a little
parsley and celery, and a bay leaf;  Pour in enough cold water to
cover the mutton entirely, stir in a heaping tablespoonful of salt,
and let the water come gradually to a boil and simmer until the mutton
has cooked twenty minutes to the pound.  Let it cool in the broth;
take it out; lay it under a weight until cold, and serve.  This is
also very good hot.  The liquor makes excellent soup.

TO FRY HAM.

First, parboil it and drain well; then fry a light brown. Make a gravy
with milk, a little flour, and a teaspoonful of sugar; pour over the
ham.

HAM TOAST.  MRS. E. SEFFNER.

Chop lean ham (the refuse bits); put in a pan with a lump of butter
the size of an egg, a little pepper, and two beaten eggs.  When well
warmed, spread on hot buttered toast.

BOILED HAM.

The best ham to select is one weighing from eight to ten pounds. Take
one that is not too fat, to save waste.  Wash it carefully before you
put it on to boil, removing rust or mold with a small, stiff scrubbing
brush.  Lay it in a large boiler, and pour over it enough cold water
to cover it.  To this add a bay leaf, half a dozen cloves, a couple of
blades of mace, a teaspoonful of sugar, and, if you can get it, a good
handful of fresh, sweet hay.  Let the water heat very gradually, not
reaching the boil under two hours.  It should never boil hard, but
simmer gently until the ham has cooked fifteen minutes to every pound.
It must cool in the liquor, and the skin should not be removed until
the meat is entirely cold, taking care not to break or tear the fat.
Brush over the ham with beaten egg, strew it thickly with very fine
bread crumbs, and brown in a quick oven.  Arrange a frill of paper
around the bone of the shank, and surround the ham with water-cress,
or garnish the dish with parsley.

TONGUE.

Wash the tongue carefully, and let it lie in cold water for several
hours before cooking–over night, if possible.  Lay it in a kettle of
cold water when it is to be cooked; bring the water to a boil slowly,
and let it simmer until the tongue is so tender that you can pierce it
with a fork.  A large tongue should be over the fire about four hours.
When it has cooled in the liquor in which it was boiled, remove the
skin with great care, beginning at the tip, and stripping it back.
Trim away the gristle and fat from the root of the tongue before
serving it.  Serve with drawn butter or lemon sauce.

FORCEMEAT BALLS.  MRS. JUDGE BENNETT.

Chop cold veal fine with one-fourth as much salt pork.  Season with
salt, pepper, and sweet herbs.  Make into balls; fry them brown.  Eat
this way, or drop into soup.

VEAL LOAF.  MRS. U. F. SEFFNER.

Three pounds of lean veal chopped with one pound of raw salt pork;
three eggs, one pint of rolled cracker; one tablespoon of salt, one
tablespoon of pepper, one tablespoon of butter, a little sage; mix all
together; make into a loaf.  Put one-half pint of water in roaster;
put in the loaf; sprinkle fine cracker crumbs over it, and some small
lumps of butter; bake slowly one hour; if baked in open pan, baste
same as turkey.

SWEET BREADS.

Parboil them in salt water; remove the skin and tough parts; cut in
pieces the size of a large oyster; dip in beaten egg; roll in cracker
crumbs, seasoned with salt and pepper; fry in hot butter, or drop in
hot lard, as you would doughnuts.

SWEET BREADS WITH PEAS.  MRS. E. S.

Parboil the sweet breads; cut in small squares; add to them a coffee
cup of cream, pepper, salt, and a tablespoon of butter.  Cook the peas
tender, and add them to the sweet breads.  Moisten a tablespoonful of
flour with a little milk; add, and boil up once or twice just before
serving.

A PICKLE FOR BEEF, PORK, TONGUE, OR HUNG BEEF.  MRS. JUDGE BENNETT.

Mix in four gallons of water a pound and a half of sugar or molasses,
and two ounces of saltpetre.  If it is to last a month or two, use six
pounds of salt.  If you wish to keep it through the summer, use nine
pounds of salt.  Boil all together; skim and let cool.  Put meat in
the vessel in which it is to stand; pour the pickle over the meat
until it is covered.  Once in two months, boil and skim the pickle and
throw in two or three ounces of sugar, and one-half pound of salt.  In
very hot weather rub meat well with salt; let it stand a few hours
before putting into the brine.  This draws the blood out.

TO CURE BEEF.  MRS. S. A. POWERS.

FOR FIFTY POUNDS.–Saltpetre, one ounce; sugar, one and three-fourths
pounds; coarse salt, three and one-half pounds; water, two gallons;
boil together; let cool; pour over meat.  Keep the meat under the
brine.