Microsoft Bing vs. WolfRam vs. TwitNit.com What’s the Future of Search?

Microsoft is soon to announce/release Kumo/Bing.com a rebranding of Live.com Search.  While Microsoft has been trying to consolidate brands in to a single “Live.com” in order to get away from preconceptions it is rebranding at Microsoft Bing.

Bing is really just Live.com with an easier “Modify my search” function.  Basically Google Suggests for Live.com.  The Interface is technically prettier than Google, but it isn’t as information dense, and doesn’t do as good of a job determining page context as Google.  This has always been the MSN/Live Search Problem.  Partially their HTML parser sucks, so they don’t read pages as well, and partially they don’t hand site authority for concepts as well as Google does.  As a results sites tend to do well for single words rather than phrases, or synonyms of words.

Wolfram just doesn’t search mainstream enough things.  You won’t find Cheats to your favorite games, nor will you find pictures of your favorite actress.  WolfRam is great if you are in elementary school, and need to know something about Thomas Jefferson, but realistically it is not your daily search.

TwitNit.com this new site uses a combination of Google and non-Google Technologies to create results that are often more relevant than Google, and in a UI that is prettier.  Twitnit.com allows you to see results from Local, Image, YouTube, and Web Search simultaneously.  This can be useful when you want quick results from where ever there is relevant data, rather than searching, and then opting for a refinement of Image, video, or local.

Twitnit.com also offers the unique easy to share URL’s  sharing a search is as simple as http://Twitnit.com/Your+Search  making it easy to twitter, e-mail, or IM searches to friends, or enter search phrases in the address bar.

None of these technologies are likely to de-thrown Google in the near future, but with a Multi-Billion Dollar industry, even one percent market share is interesting.

(Disclosure: XYHD.tv receives most of its income from Google, and TwitNit is part of Blackwater Ops )