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DIY 110 Inch Home Theater Projection Screen For Under $100

The steps are over here at Howcast.com, but I wanted to talk about some of the stuff that isn’t the “how to” here.

Building a Home Theater Screen from Blackout Cloth is a VERY cost effective way to get a great experience on a budget.   Even if money is no object, this is a great solution.

The big advantage to doing it yourself is that I got a screen that isn’t the standard dimensions.  My screen is 96×50  which is not the 1.777 that 16:9 is.  it is 1.92:1 which doesn’t get me to the 2.4:1 that some movies are but does get me to the 1.84 that many movies are. This lets me use the Zoom to push the letterboxing off the screen, and have a larger screen than what I would have been able to with a 16:9 screen  Since I ran out of width long before I ran out of height this was ideal for me.   Blackout cloth comes in 54 inch width, so that was the limiting factor in how tall my screen could be, but my wall is only 11 feet wide, and I didn’t want to go all the way to the edges so that when I wasn’t projecting, my room didn’t look too weird.  I also found that if I made the screen to big that at my viewing distance that it was like sitting too far forward in the movie theatre and I would have to crank my neck to see the screen.

DIY Home Theater Projection Screen

The pure white cloth is great since it doesn’t muck with the colors the way a beige wall would, or the way ivory screen would.  And unlike using Silver, I get very black blacks during even day light use.

I used Aluminum for part of the frame so it is lighter than if I had used all wood.  It is also more rigid, which proved important as I had to add some support to the screen because it bowed a little when I hung it on the wall.

I did my test projections with a tripod which wasn’t quite level which is why the image above looks slanted.

I am very happy with the results of this project, and would encourage anyone looking at buying a projection screen to consider building one instead.

I’ll post my review of the Optoma HD66 that I bought for this project Shortly.